Full citation

Aquino Shluzas, L. M. and L. J. Leifer (2014). "The insight-value-perception (iVP) model for user-centered design." Technovation 34(11): 649-662.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Case-based research

Experience level of reader: Fundamental

Annotation: The insight-value-perception model is presented to examine practices within eight medical device firms. This study investigates how doctors as end users effect new product adaptation and influence the companies that produce them.

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant:  Community, Federal Lab, Government, Large business, Small business, University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Policy makers, Clinicians, Brokers, Manufacturers, Developers, Intermediaries, Users, Advocates, and Researchers.

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Individual, Organizations, Sectors

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary findings

Barriers

The market value of new medical technology varies based on need.
Case-based research
Occurrences within the model: KTA 6.A, NtK Tip 6.C, NtK 2.2, 4.3

Carriers

  • Coordination between product development teams and functional departments is linked to greater product success at market.
    Case-based research
    Occurrences within the model: NtK 7.4, 7.9, 7.10
  • Physicians as end users can contribute meaningful information to manufacturers and regulators governing healthcare and drugs.
    Case-based research
    Occurrences within the model: NtK 3.1, 4.1, 7.13
  • Increase relative product value for multiple stakeholders with conflicting needs while simultaneously minimizing the need for end users to change behaviors.  
    Case-based research
    Occurrences within the model: NtK 2.1

Methods

  • Use various product simulation conditions to optimize products for widespread use.
    Case-based research
    Occurrences within the model: NtK 5.3
  • Users in user-centered design can be classified into sub-groups. Patients, healthcare personnel and caregivers are primary users where trainees, engineers, researchers, etc. are secondary users.
    Case-based research
    Occurrences within the model: NtK 3.1, 4.1, 4.6

Models

(2) The Technology Acceptance Model asserts usefulness/perceived usefulness drives a user’s decision to adopt new technology. In: Davis, F.D., 1989. Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and user acceptance of information technology. MIS Quarterly 13, 319–340.
Case-based research
Occurrences within the model: NtK Tip 6.C, NtK 2.2