Course Descriptions

CHB 550 Public Health and Population Well Being

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

The course will provide students with an understanding of and appreciation for population approaches to improving the health of our nation and the world, as well as knowledge of various career paths in public health. Course content includes: public health perspectives on health, wellness, illness, and population well-being; key influences on the health and well being of individuals and populations; assessing public health problems from a population health perspective; using the five core components of public health to address health problems; effectively utilizing health information to address public health issues; and career paths in public health and the training/expertise required to pursue them. Students will engage in critical assessment of historical and current public health events, and creative application of their foundational knowledge to new public health problems. The course is particularly applicable to students preparing to pursue a health-related career and to students in health professions programs desiring a knowledge of public health approaches.

Instructor: Kiviniemi

PT 501 Professional Development

1 Credit, Fall Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals in a safe and professional manner. To accomplish this, students will be exposed to the history of the profession and the professional association, the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice, APTA Core Documents including the Code of Ethics, the New York State Practice Act, current and future modes of delivery of health care, behavioral sciences, and safety in clinical practice. The emphasis in the area of behavioral sciences will include ethics and values, teaching and learning theory, applied professional behavior, and communication and decision making in the inter-professional environment.

PT 502 Professional Development II

1 Credit, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals in a safe and professional manner. To accomplish this, students will be exposed to the history of the profession and the professional association, the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice, APTA Core Documents including the Code of Ethics, the New York State Practice Act, current and future modes of delivery of health care, behavioral sciences, and safety in clinical practice. The emphasis in the area of behavioral sciences will include ethics and values, teaching and learning theory, applied professional behavior, and communication and decision making in the inter-professional environment.

PT 503 Medical Sciences I

3 Credits, Spring Semester

First course of a two semester sequence of courses covering topics in the medical sciences relevant to rehabilitation professionals. Medical Sciences I emphasizes the principles and concepts of inflammation & repair, infection, immunology, pharmacology and neoplasms. In addition, the pathopysiology of the cardiovascular, pulmonary and endocrine systems is covered with emphasis on etiology, cellular and tissue pathology, impairments, medical diagnosis and management, and indications/contraindications for rehabilitation. The intent of this course is to provide students with knowledge of medical disorders commonly encountered by physical and occupational therapists and to facilitate the students' understanding of the medical management of disease. A seminar portion of the course provides a forum for students to integrate pharmacologic management with rehabilitation interventions.

PT 504 Medical Sciences II

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Second semester of Medical Sciences focuses on the pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal, neromuscular, endocrine, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Again emphasis is placed on etiology, cellular and tissue pathology, impairments, and medical diagnosis and management, and indications/contraindications for rehabilitation. This course is offered in a seminar format to facilitate the students understanding of medical management of disease and to initiate problem solving related to physical therapy management. The seminar component of the course will enable students to integrate medical and pharmocologic management with physical therapy interventions.

PT 505 Evidence Based Practice I

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Physical therapists require state of the art knowledge of diagnostic tests and efficacy of interventions used in daily practice. This course provides the student with the skills to evaluate clinical diagnostic and standardized tests and interventions including potential harm arising from treatment. Additionally, students gain an understanding of the clinical decision making process using the literature combined with clinical judgment for best practice. 

PT 508 Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy

5 Credits, Spring Semester

This course will prepare the student to effectively manage patients with cardiovascular and/or pulmonary impairments and related disabilities. Emphasis is placed on the components of physical therapy practice – screening, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, development of a plan of care, intervention, and evaluations of outcomes. Students will learn the evaluation and management of patients with acute and chronic cardiac and pulmonary impairments across the lifespan and across treatment settings (critical care to outpatient). The interrelationship of other health care professionals in the team care of patients will be discussed. Application of the following concepts is included: communication, individual & cultural differences, professional behavior, critical inquiry and clinical decision-making, patient/family education, pharmacology, and management of care delivery. Course material is integrated in patient case studies and simulation experiences. The course incorporates seminars, small group patient case discussions, self-study assignments, clinical labs, and simulations. The use of case studies and high fidelity simulations allows students to be more active in the learning process and emphasizes problem solving, integration of knowledge, skill development, and clinical decision making. Individual student preparation is essential for each seminar, case discussion, and laboratory session. To do well in this course, you will have to be more responsible and independent than you would be in more lecture-oriented courses.

PT 509 Foundations of Physical Therapy I

5 Credits, Fall Semester

This foundational course will focus on the physical therapy evaluation techniques of anatomical palpation, manual muscle testing and goniometry. The course will also cover systems review, general exercise prescription and implementation of basic therapeutic exercise to treat the upper extremities, spine, and lower extremities. The study of medical terminology is imbedded within the course. Application of the following concepts will arise: communication, professional behavior, critical inquiry, clinical decision-making, and patient/family education.

PT 510 Foundations of Physical Therapy II

4 Credits, Spring Semester

Foundations II provides the necessary skills to perform a comprehensive systems evaluation and the necessary skills for effective patient management. Attention will focus primarily on examining the major systems of the body, as well as performing a functional screen and using appropriate documentation for different practice settings. Special emphasis will be placed on patient safety and handling techniques, patient’s transfers and mobility and assistive devices. Application of the following concepts will arise: communication, professional behavior, patient-practitioner interaction, critical inquiry & clinical decision-making (differential diagnosis), and therapeutic prescription. Theory, principles and methods of direct interventions will be discussed in lecture while psychomotor skills will be practiced in laboratory. Lecture and laboratories will include small group discussions related to selected clinical cases. Individual student preparation is required for each lecture and laboratory session.

PT 511 Health and Wellness

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients and other related individuals on all levels. A primary goal for the practicum is for students to gain an appreciation of health and wellness programs available in the community. The second important goal is to give the student the opportunity to practice interacting with clients. To develop these skills takes practice, and the most meaningful practice is that which occurs in the community rather than in an academic setting.

PT 512 Clinical Experience I

4 Credits, Fall Semester

Prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient's families, and other related individuals on all levels. To accomplish this students will participate in direct patient care in an inpatient or out patient setting with emphasis on patient management with chronic cardiac or pulmonary conditions under the supervision of a volunteer adjunct clinical faculty member. Students will be required to maintain a "full" caseload of patients by the conclusion of the clinical experience. Clinical experience II, PT 512 utilizes direct patient care and recitation/seminar format, to facilitate the student development of problem solving and critical analysis of patient care. Individual preparation will be necessary for participation in the clinical practice setting. Student activities will include but not limited to; patient examination, patient treatment, patient and family education, article presentations, and all aspects of patient care.

PT 600 Community Service in Physical Therapy

1 Credit, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with the community by being involved in community service. To accomplish this, students will be exposed to a community service organization that should not be directly related to the field of Physical Therapy. The students will be involved in some community service project for the organization with which they choose to participate.

PT 601 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I

6 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the student to practice entry level orthopedic physical therapy relative to the management of the axial skeleton and all the joints associated therewith. Preparation includes evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal system dysfunction utilizing specific musculoskeletal problems and the planning and implementation of appropriate physical therapy interventions. Students learn to recognize major signs and symptoms of systemic disease that can mimic primary musculoskeletal lesions. Evaluation tools are presented to help students recognize problems that are beyond physical therapy expertise. Students learn how to make treatment versus referral decisions for patients who present with presumed musculoskeletal problems. 

PT 602 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II

6 Credits, Fall Semester

This course prepares the student to practice entry level orthopedic physical therapy relative to the management of the peripheral joints of the upper and lower extremities. Evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal system dysfunction utilizing specific musculoskeletal problems and to plan and implement appropriate physical therapy interventions. Students learn to recognize major signs and symptoms of systemic disease that can mimic primary musculoskeletal lesions. Evaluation tools are presented to help students recognize problems that are beyond physical therapy expertise. Students learn how to make treatment versus referral decisions for patients who present with presumed musculoskeletal problems. Problem solving and critical inquiry will be addressed through various case reviews and simulations. Concepts and techniques will be introduced in lecture and lab and students are expected to reinforce these though home study including review of required text and practice of evaluation and treatment procedures. 

PT 603 Neuromuscular Physical Therapy I

6 Credits, Fall Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to effectively manage patients with neuromuscular dysfunction. To do this students will apply the components of physical therapy practice, screening, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, outcomes assessment & evaluation, to the patient with neuromuscular dysfunction. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the physical therapist as a Movement Scientist with development of skills to determine movement dysfunction leading to functional limitations. Students will learn to identify underlying impairments that lead to functional limitations for a variety of patients across the lifespan with neuromuscular dysfunction irrespective of the medical diagnosis. The course is offered in a lecture, laboratory and seminar format to facilitate the students problem solving and critical analysis of patients with Neurologic dysfunction. Examination and intervention skills discussed in lecture will be practiced in lab, and applied to case scenarios discussed and critically analyzed in seminar. Individual student preparation is required for each laboratory session. 

PT 604 Neuromuscular Physical Therapy II

4 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to effectively manage pediatric and adult patients with specific neuromuscular diagnoses. Students will apply the components of physical therapy practice, screening, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, outcomes assessment & evaluation, to patients with spinal cord injury, vestibular dysfunction, traumatic brain injury and multi-system problems. Students will incorporate analysis of movement and identification of underlying impairments that lead to functional limitations for a variety of patients with specific medical diagnosis. The course is offered in a lecture, laboratory and seminar format to facilitate the students problem solving and critical analysis of patients with Neurologic dysfunction. Examination and intervention skills discussed in lecture will be applied to case scenarios and practiced in lab. Individual student preparation is required for each laboratory session.

PT 605 Interprofessional Case Management

3 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to function as an effective member of an interprofessional healthcare team by developing their professional skills and their teamwork and communication skills. Through seminars and case discussions with other health professions students, students will develop the core competencies of interprofessional collaborative practice (values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, communication, and cultural engagement) and have opportunities to develop plans of care using an interprofessional approach. Management of patients across the continuum of care using an interprofessional team approach will prepare students for subsequent interprofessional clinical experiences. The student’s will have opportunity to demonstrate their current clinical knowledge and skills by engaging in an instructional standardized patient exam (ISPE). Professional development will occur through self-assessment activities and mentoring and peer-review experiences. Students will prepare for their professional career through exploration of physical therapy careers, development of a professional resume, and gaining skills for identifying and evaluating potential employment opportunities. This course is offered in a seminar format and incorporates team-based learning to facilitate the student’s problem solving and critical analysis of the topics discussed. 

PT 607 Professional Development III

1 Credit, Spring Semester

This course will provide a framework in which students can continue to develop professional attitudes and insights requisite for sustained growth throughout their careers. This course will integrate fundamental concepts of inquiry and problem solving that are addressed throughout the DPT curriculum.

PT 611 Foundations of Physical Therapy III

3 Credits, Spring Semester

This three-credit lecture/laboratory course prepares the future physical therapist to select, provide rationale for, and administer to surrogate patients physical agents including massage, cold, superficial heat, hydrotherapy, short wave diathermy, ultrasound, iontophoresis, and electrotherapy for inducing muscle contractions, reducing pain and enhancing wound healing. The course also introduces basic concepts of electrophysiologic testing including nerve conduction studies and clinical electromyography. Application of the following general concepts will be included: communication, individual & cultural differences, professional behavior, critical inquiry and clinical decision-making, patient/family education. Theory, principles and methods of direct interventions and electrophysiologic testing will be discussed in lecture; psychomotor skills for direct interventions will be practiced in lab. Lecture sessions and labs will also include small group discussions related to selected concepts and clinical cases. Individual student preparation is required for each instructional session.

PT 612 Integumentary Physical Therapy

4 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to effectively manage patients with integumentary dysfunction, as well as those requiring orthotics or prosthetic management. Students will apply the components of physical therapy practice, screening, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, outcomes assessment and evaluation, to the patient. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the physical therapist as a Movement Scientist and skills developed to assess a variety of patients across the lifespan including those with integumentary dysfunction, and those requiring orthotics or prosthetic management, irrespective of medical diagnosis.

PT 613 Clinical Experience II

4 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals on all levels. To accomplish this students will participate in direct patient care in an inpatient or outpatient settings with supervision by a volunteer adjunct clinical faculty member. The emphasis will be on patient with musculoskeletal or neurologic dysfunction. Students will be required to maintain a “full” caseload of patients by the conclusion of the clinical experience. This course is the third in the series of clinical education experiences and the first to provide experiences related to patients with cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal or neurologic dysfunctions. The course objectives and behaviors will be enhanced and expanded during this clinical experience.

PT 614 Clinical Internship

6 Credits, Fall Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals on all levels. To accomplish this students will participate in direct patient care in a variety of settings with supervision by a volunteer adjunct clinical faculty member. An emphasis in an area of specialization will also be considered but not required at this time. Students will be required to maintain a “full” caseload of patients throughout the clinical internship. This course is the fourth in the series of clinical education experiences and the second to allow students access to patients with cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, or neurologic dysfunction. The objectives and behaviors are enhanced and expanded from previous clinical experiences.

PT 701 Management Sciences for Physical Therapy

4 Credits, Fall Semester

This course will provide an in-depth, critical review of management and leadership issues relevant to the physical therapist. Students will be exposed to the business aspects of physical therapy and learn the mechanics of developing and promoting rehabilitation services. Students will also be exposed to management and financial theories and practices, professional Codes of Ethics and Practice Acts, health care and rehabilitation service delivery, design and structure of rehabilitation clinics, supervision issues, ethical issues, and the development and implementation of outcome measures. Learning experiences provided for students will include lectures, blackboard posting/responses, self learning projects, and small group discussions. Students are expected to complete required readings and assignments in preparation for each class. 

PT 703 Critical Analysis of Patient Care & Management

4 Credits, Fall Semester

Physical therapists are responsible for the critical analysis of care provided to their patients. This course, founded on evidenced based practice, will require students to critically analyze the management of patients they had treated on clinical rotations. More specifically, analysis will include the physical therapy examination, evaluation, intervention and outcomes documented during the patient’s rehabilitative care as well as the medical management of the condition. Students will present case analyses to their peers, faculty and master clinicians. 

PT 705 Lifespan Physical Therapy

4 Credits, Fall Semester

This course prepares future physical therapists to effectively examine and provide physical therapy interventions to pediatric and geriatric populations. Students will apply the components of physical therapy practice, screening, examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, outcomes assessment and evaluation, to patients at each end of the lifespan. Students will learn to identify underlying impairments in multiple physiological systems that lead to functional limitations in pediatric and geriatric populations. The course is offered in a lecture and laboratory format. Examination and interventions skills discussed in lecture will be practiced in the laboratory, and applied to case scenarios.

PT 707 Professional Development VI

2 Credits, Fall Semester

This course will be the final course in the professional development series. The Department of Physical Therapy is committed to professional excellence and leadership expressed in service to others. Individuals achieve excellence and become leaders by seeking professional development and service opportunities that extend beyond the requirements of the workplace and classroom. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), state, and local physical therapy associations are committed to advancing the profession of physical therapy and improving the health and physical function of the public. These organizations provide numerous opportunities for professional development and service that go beyond the minimum expectations of the classroom and workplace. This course will emphasize lifelong learning, advocacy for the profession, as well as involvement in the APTA. Additionally, this course will provide clinical enrichment in various practice areas through the presentation of elective seminars.

PT 712 Clinical Residency

6 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals on all levels.  To accomplish this students will participate in direct patient care in a variety of settings with supervision by a volunteer adjunct clinical faculty member. An emphasis in an area of specialization will also be considered but not required at this time. Students will be required to maintain a “full” caseload of patients throughout the clinical residency. This course is the culmination of the clinical education experiences for the DPT degree. This progression leads to a student performing at an entry level of competence during this final experience.

PT 713 Clinical Residency

6 Credits, Spring Semester

This course prepares the future physical therapist to interact with patients, patient’s families, and other related individuals on all levels. To accomplish this students will participate in direct patient care in a variety of settings with supervision by a volunteer adjunct clinical faculty member. An emphasis in an area of specialization will also be considered but not required at this time. Students will be required to maintain a "full" caseload of patients throughout the clinical residency. This course is the culmination of the clinical education experiences for the DPT degree. This progression leads to a student performing at an entry level of competence during this final experience.

PT 718 Enrichment Capstone

2 Credits, Spring Semester

The purpose of enrichment capstone is to provide students the opportunity to explore areas of interest from a broader perspective beyond what is offered in the didactic or clinical education program in the DPT curriculum. The capstone project is intended to be an intensive, active learning project, requiring significant effort in the planning and implementation. It will include the preparation of a substantial final written report or presentation. The final reports should include the outcomes of the student's experience in addressing the clinical/research equation identified by the student(s) and their mentor. Along with the final report, students should submit any product that resulted from the project, i.e, a video tape, text or CD.