Global Health Courses

The University at Buffalo offers a number of courses to help you incorporate a global perspective into your area of study.

Global Health Courses

Winter 2016

GEO 334 International Business Cultures

Introduces students to the interconnections among culture, social expectations, and international business. Covers cross-cultural communication and negotiation, cross-cultural management and alliance formation, and corporate social and environmental responsibility. The course is designed to challenge students to understand difference and to overcome stereotypes in thinking about the operation of business in different parts of the world.

GEO 403 The Globalization of Africa

This class is designed to examine the impact of globalization within the bounds of Sub-Saharan Africa. From colonization to free trade, Africa?s natural resources have been an attraction to outsiders. How has Sub-Saharan Africa been positively and negatively impacted by this history of globalization? How have trade patterns changed over the centuries? How is modern day globalization and foreign invest changing the culture and economy of these nations? Through the use of case studies, videos, interactive websites and lectures, we will begin to understand how globalization has impacted Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) differently than the rest of the world.

NTR 108 Human Nutrition

Explores basic concepts integral to the science of nutrition. Emphasizes metabolic and physiologic principles underlying digestion and absorption of nutrients, chemical structure and metabolic fate of nutrients, the biochemical role of nutrients in maintaining health, and the effects of over- and under-nutrition on disease pathogenesis.

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology

General survey of perception; learning and memory; cognitive, developmental, personality, abnormal, and social psychology; and behavioral neuroscience. Requires participation in research or a short paper. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade other than W may repeat the course in the summer or only in the fall or spring semester with a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' Office.

Study Abroad Tanzania: Community Development in Context

This winter session course is open to students from any U.S. institution with a focus on examining community development through four interrelated lenses: education, health, economics, and infrastructure. Through this unique 12-day experiential learning course, students will travel to a rural region of Northern Tanzania in Sub-Saharan Africa Armed with pre-trip readings and guiding questions, students will engage in high-impact activities designed to foster critical reflection and transformative learning. Trip highlights will include visits to community development projects, clinics and schools; engagement with local villagers, community leaders, and educators; and a guided safari through the famed Serengeti Game Preserve. For more information contact Mara Huber, mbhuber@buffalo.edu. Register now, only a few spots are left. 

Spring 2016 Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2016 Graduate Level Courses

Fall 2015 Undergraduate Courses

APY 106 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Surveys important ideas about culture and society that have shaped cultural anthropology. Studies the principal institutions of culture - language, social organization, religion, economics, politics, artistic expression, etc. - in their traditional ethnographic context and as they change through cultural contact and modernization.

APY 448 Human Genetics/Legal and Ethical Issues

Recent advances in genetic technology have presented the scientific and lay community with ethical and legal problems, yet to be resolved. The objective of this course is to provide an opportunity for informed discussions of such issues relating to contemporary human/medical issues.

CHB 450 Public Health and Population Well Being

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

The course will provide students with an understanding of and appreciation for population approaches to improving the health of our nation and the world, as well as knowledge of various career paths in public health. Course content includes: public health perspectives on health, wellness, illness, and population well-being; key influences on the health and well being of individuals and populations; assessing public health problems from a population health perspective; using the five core components of public health to address health problems; effectively utilizing health information to address public health issues; and career paths in public health and the training/expertise required to pursue them. Students will engage in critical assessment of historical and current public health events, and creative application of their foundational knowledge to new public health problems. The course is particularly applicable to students preparing to pursue a health-related career and to students in health professions programs desiring a knowledge of public health approaches.

Instructor: Kiviniemi

CDS 151 Intro to Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Surveys the field of communication disorders and introduces the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology. Introduces the nature of communication disorders and the effects of speech-language-hearing handicaps on the lives of individuals, families, and society. An informational course for students in education, social, and health-related fields who deal with persons whose communicative behaviors are at variance with the norm.

COM 202 Intercultural Communication

Explores cultural factors that impinge upon the process of human communication; gives attention to nonverbal and verbal factors, as well as international mass media.

COM 380 Health Communication

Examines health communication and health communication campaigns in the interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication contexts with an emphasis on communication research.

EEH 301 Introduction to Epidemiology

Introduces the basic principles of epidemiology and it's role in public health.

ES 468 Epidemiology and Public Health for Health Professionals

3 Credits, Fall Semester

The purpose of this course is to provide students in health professions degree programs an introduction to epidemiology and a foundational knowledge of public health concepts. Students will learn basic epidemiologic principles and methods and apply them to current public health issues, particularly those related to their discipline. Topics include an overview and history of public health, how epidemiologic methods have evolved over time to help us study disease, the natural history and transmission of disease, investigation of an outbreak, basic epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association and risk, criteria used to assess causal relationships in health, and basic principles of population screening and surveillance.

ECO 411 Health Economics

Investigates economic behavior of the health-care industry, including hospital services, physicians, and health insurance; and considers rationales for government intervention in planning and insuring.

GEO 100 Geographic Perspectives and World Issues

Examines the geography of the emerging global village, especially the stress between the increasing globalization of human societies and natural habitats, and their idiosyncratic traits. Deeply rooted in today's changing world, the course surveys regions of the world and the contemporary issues facing them.

GEO 345 Water Resources

Examines the occurrence, use, management, and conservation of water and water resources in the U.S. and around the world. The course further discusses the environmental, economic, and social implications of floods, droughts, dams, water usage, and waste water, as well as current issues in water quality, water pollution, and water resource regulation.

GEO 412 Geography of Health

Studies human disease and health from an ecological prospective. Students gain an appreciation for the geographic variation in the rates of both infectious and chronic diseases. The effect of the environment will be examined in terms of population density, climate, socio-economic conditions, political situation, mobility, urbanization, pollution, cultural practices, and access to health care.

GEO 435 Conservation Biogeography

Examines components of biodiversity: what it is, why we like it, where it is highest, and what threatens it. Focuses on the application of spatial solutions to biodiversity maintenance in wild lands, and to biodiversity management in working landscapes (especially logged but also farmed). Case studies and a field trip are employed to explore the usefulness of the methods.

GGS 101 Intro to Gender and Women Studies

Introduces students to basic concepts in women's studies. Covers the history of the women's movement and its relation to the rise of women's studies as a discipline. Examines and discusses a multiplicity of 'recurring themes' affecting differing women's lives; including the social construction of gender, the impact of race, sexuality, reproduction, work, education, media, material condition (class), and women's agency. Discusses current controversies among feminists, and the broader political arena. Discovers how studying women's history challenges traditional notions of women and traditional notions of history

MIC 301 Microbiology for Allied Health

MIC 301 is a one-semester introduction to microbiology with a focus on biomedical aspects and human health appropriate for students in fields of allied health such as nursing, exercise and social science as well as psychology. Lecture topics in the first half include Microbial metabolism and growth, classification and diagnostics, sterilization and antimicrobial agents, interaction between pathogens and the host`s immune system and our developing understanding of the human microbiome. In the second part of the course, important disease causing microorganisms from the three major areas, prokaryotic bacteria, eukaryotic parasites/fungi, and viruses, will be discussed. In the laboratory components, basic techniques for diagnostics, cultivation, and control of microbial growth are introduced in hands-on sessions, case studies/recitations, and online interactive modules.

NBS 372 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

Introduces the concepts of health promotion as a framework for nursing practice within the healthcare delivery system. Provides the opportunity to examine and implement health promotion programs on the individual and community level. Must be taken in program sequence.

NSG 295 Statistics for Health Care

NSG 309 Health Assessment: Concepts and Skills

Prepares students to perform a health assessment on an adult and child. Emphasizes a systematic and comprehensive health assessment as a database for identifying nursing diagnoses. Highlights developmental aspects, sociocultural influences, health-illness perceptions, normal variations of health-status findings, and documentation throughout the course. Students become familiar with the use of assessment instruments through practice in a supervised on-campus laboratory. Must be taken in program sequence.

NSG 393 Informatics and the Health Care Environment

Introduces students to the health care environment emphasizing the interface between the health care delivery system and informatics. Explores various environments where people obtain health care, including clinics, hospitals, and community settings. Students become familiar with health care terminology, government health policies, and the influence of managed care organizations on the health care environment.

NSG 410 Public Health Nursing for Population Health

NSG 472 Promoting Quality Health Outcomes and Culture of Safety

Examines nursing management skills and behaviors with applicability in a wide variety of client-care settings. Emphasizes organizational structure and behavior, applying information management and case-management techniques to the management of care for groups of clients, and applying principles of delegation, supervision, and personnel evaluation to management of care provided by others. Must be taken in program sequence.

NTR 108 Human Nutrition

Explores basic concepts integral to the science of nutrition. Emphasizes metabolic and physiologic principles underlying digestion and absorption of nutrients, chemical structure and metabolic fate of nutrients, the biochemical role of nutrients in maintaining health, and the effects of over- and under-nutrition on disease pathogenesis.

NTR 401 Nutrition and Health

Discusses nutrition as an important element for maintaining optimal health. Emphasizes the importance of each nutrient based on its biochemical and physiological functions. Also covers nutritional needs at specific stages in the life cycle, and the implication of nutrition in major health problems in the United States, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and cancer. Students learn to determine nutritional status through dietary analysis and to evaluate nutritional information.

PSC 332 International Organizations

Examines the United Nations, specialized agencies, and other intergovernmental organizations in peacekeeping, economic development, and social welfare; also studies regional integration.

PSC 430 Human Rights

Examines the development, primarily since World War II, of international systems for the promotion and protection of human rights.

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology

General survey of perception; learning and memory; cognitive, developmental, personality, abnormal, and social psychology; and behavioral neuroscience. Requires participation in research or a short paper. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade other than W may repeat the course in the summer or only in the fall or spring semester with a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' Office.

PSY 325 Health Psychology

Introduces the scientific study of the behavioral and social aspects of health.

PSY 404 Alcohol and Health

The relationship between alcohol use and psychological, social, and physical well-being. Conceptualizes problem drinking within a social psychological paradigm; implications of different conceptions for the prevention and treatment of alcohol problems.

PSY 451 Drug Addiction

The scientific study of drug addiction, emphasizing biological and psychological theories.

SOC 311 Drugs and Society

Examines the relationship between drugs and social context. Understanding this relationship is critical for gaining insight into why, despite the risks, people find consciousness alteration meaningful; what kinds of experiences and problems arise from their use, and what types of social policies emerge in attempts to control use. Specific areas of interest will include: shifting perspectives on drug usage in society, the emergence of drug crusades and drug legislation in America, the difference between 'licit' and 'illicit' drugs and why they become defined as such, the use and misuse of various substances, the relationship between drug use and crime, the prevention and treatment of alcohol and drug problems, and current domestic and international drug control policies.

SOC 322 Medical Sociology

Provides an overview of the theories and empirical research that reflect how sociologists think about, research, and analyze medical issues, medical workers and patients, health and illness, and the social organization of health care.

SSC 218 Issues in Mental Health

Identifies community mental health service components and explores trends and issues in the delivery of mental health services.

SSC 420 Child Mental Health

Examines the human service system as it affects the mental health needs of children; also addresses specific needs of special groups.

STA 119 Statistical Methods

Covers topics in descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and experimental design, all of which are put together to draw conclusions from uncertainty through analysis of experimental data. Although a general statistical methods course, the material (through examples) is geared towards sciences majors, especially those in the health sciences. Looks into the underlying reasoning behind the techniques rather than just pure application.

STA 427 Introduction to Medical Statistics

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability concepts (such as independence and conditional probability), probability distributions of random variables, sampling distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance procedures, linear regression, and nonparametric methods. Computers and statistical packages are used throughout the course. Requires no extensive computer experience.

Fall 2015 Graduate Level Courses

CHB 500 Health and the Public: Health, Medicine, and Illness in Social Context

In this course we will examine the social nature of health, illness, and medicine. Over the first half of the semester we will seek to understand how the context of a person’s life shapes their likelihood of achieving good health and susceptibility to illness. We will explore the social patterning of health, longevity, and disease in the US today. We will then turn to understanding the social factors that shape health. Finally, we will examine the role of medical care in contributing to health in the US. We will explore these issues through the lens of social science, biology, epidemiology, economics, public policy, and medicine. At the end of the semester we will explore a tension at the heart of current debates in the US – the difference between an individualistic and public health-oriented perspective on illnessWe examine the ethics, justice, and inequalities surrounding health in the US today. We will debate if a different organization of society, public health expenditures, or public policy would increase people’s health.  Students will focus on applying empirical evidence and theory to design evidence-based public health interventions to improve community health. Contact Dr. Bouchard eagage@buffalo.edu for more information.

CHB 500, Special Topics, Health for Refugee Populations

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

With over 54 million individuals displaced within or outside their countries according to 2013-14 estimates (and the number is rising), refugees represent a major global public health issue. Those who are able to resettle to Western New York represent a significant local public health and individual health care issue. This course provides an introduction to both the global and local health issues related to refugee populations. Health, cultural issues, barriers to care, and services for refugee populations in the United States will be featured, with an emphasis on Western New York’s (WNY) refugee groups. Global historical and policy issues related to refugees and refugee health will also be studied. Through the course, students will use an ecological model to explore (a) policy issues, (b) cultural issues, (c) stress encountered by refugees, (d) major health issues (including mental health) affecting refugee communities, and (d) unmet needs for this underserved population. The class will consider the priorities for refugee health developed by local groups and discuss research needs and practical service or intervention models to address refugee health and ways to evaluate their effectiveness. Local representatives of refugee care and refugee groups will help lead selected classes and participate in discussions. Interprofessional education and care perspectives will be advanced through guest speakers across multiple health domains, service agency presentations, small group work, and experiential learning. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for further work (policy, research or service) in an inter-professionally collaborative manner in the area of refugee health with appropriate cultural competency skills and an understanding of the needs, priorities, and challenges faced by refugees and by organizations and providers who work with refugees.

Instructors: Kozlowski/Collins

CHB 501 Study of Health Behavior

Designed to provide you with a graduate‐level overview of the role of the social and behavioral sciences in understanding and addressing public health problems. Three general topics are covered. First, we examine how psychological, social, and environmental factors influence people’s health and wellbeing. Second, we explore factors that influence health behavior, including individual, social, and environmental/community influences. Third, we explore how understanding behavior and social/environmental influences on health informs public health approaches to improving health and preventing disease. The course prepares public health students to satisfy MPH competencies in social and behavioral sciences.

CHB 523 Introduction to Program Planning and Evaluation

Program Planning and Evaluation is a master's level course designed to develop three major practical skill sets: (1) The identification of population-based needs for public health intervention (2) Development of programs to meet those needs, and (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of these public health interventions.

CHB 550 Public Health and Population Wellbeing

The course will provide students with an understanding of and appreciation for population approaches to improving the health of our nation and the world, as well as knowledge of various career paths in public health. Course content includes: public health perspectives on health, wellness, illness, and population well-being; key influences on the health and well being of individuals and populations; assessing public health problems from a population health perspective; using the five core components of public health to address health problems; effectively utilizing health information to address public health issues; and career paths in public health and the training/expertise required to pursue them. Students will engage in critical assessment of historical and current public health events, and creative application of their foundational knowledge to new public health problems. The course is particularly applicable to students preparing to pursue a health-related career and to students in health professions programs desiring a knowledge of public health approaches.

3 Credits, Fall Semester

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive, doctoral-level overview of principles and theoretical perspectives on the determinants of health behavior and community health. Using a biopsychosocial perspective we will examine biological influences, psychological, social, and policy determinants of health behavior and health. 

Instructor: Orom

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Health Disparities is a PhD-level elective designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the social determinants of health. The course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to examining differences in health status associated with race, ethnicity, education, income, disability, geographic location, gender, and sexual orientation. We will examine the multiple pathways through which these differences are produced and reinforced, including discrimination, stigma, social network processes, culture, and health care experiences. We will also discuss methods for conducting research and intervening in disadvantaged communities. The course will provide historical and theoretical perspectives on the problem, provide a critical examination of empirical support for various explanatory pathways, and will cover approaches to studying and reducing health disparities. The course will prepare students to conduct independent research on health disparities and health-related research with disadvantaged communities, satisfying many of the Community Health and Health Behavior PhD competencies.

Instructor: Orom

ECO 511 Health Economics

This course deals with major health issues and policies that apply internationally, especially those that show great variation between rich and poor countries. Students will learn to do careful and systematic empirical research. The class also emphasizes the very special features of the economics of medical care in rich countries, particularly the roles of uncertainty and insurance. Lastly, the multi-faceted role of government in the development, delivery, and regulation of medical care will be discussed.

EEH 501 Principles of Epidemiology

4 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the basic principles, methods, and uses of epidemiology. This course is a master’s/doctoral level course designed to introduce epidemiology, its methods and its role in public health. A major portion of the course will be devoted to an overview of fundamental epidemiologic methods used in public health research and practice. The student will be familiarized with basic measures used in describing disease frequency in populations. Descriptive and analytic approaches to the study of disease will be explored, and a perspective on the role of epidemiologic methods in health services planning and evaluation will be provided. Problem solving exercises will be used to provide students with an opportunity to tabulate data and apply subject matter developed during lectures and in reading assignments. At the end of the course students should have a general understanding of the uses and limitations of epidemiologic inquiry. This understanding should provide the basis for applying epidemiologic concepts in work-related settings and in other courses in the public health curriculum.

Instructor: LaMonte

EEH 573 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: EEH 501

Focuses on the theory and epidemiologic methods used in the epidemiologic study of infectious diseases. Emphasis is on the investigation of infectious disease outbreaks, evaluations of vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, and surveillance for infectious diseases of public health importance. The course includes an examination of the following infectious diseases, among others: HIV/AIDs, influenza, foodborne disease, sexually transmitted infections, dengue fever, and vaccine-preventable diseases.

Instructor: Zorich

EEH 521 Global Health

Provides an overview of compelling public health problems among the world’s poor. Topics addressed will include infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis; the rise of tobacco-related disease; the role of water, hygiene, and sanitation in the prevention of disease; maternal and neonatal mortality; surveillance; and disaster response in the resource-poor setting. Students will gain practical experience in developing and presenting strategies for the implementation and evaluation of public health programs in the resource-poor setting. Contact Dr. Pavani Ram, pkram@buffalo.edu, for more information.

ES 568 Epidemiology/Public Health

Cross-listed with NTR 568
The purpose of this course is to provide students in Health Professions degree programs an introduction to epidemiology and a foundational knowledge of public health concepts. Students will learn basic epidemiologic principles and methods and apply them to current public health issues, particularly those related to their discipline. Topics include an overview and history of public health, how epidemiologic methods have evolved over time to help us study disease, the natural history and transmission of disease, investigation of an outbreak, basic epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association and risk, criteria used to assess causal relationships in health, and basic principles of population screening and surveillance.

GEO 503 International Development

This seminar will provide students with an advanced understanding of theory and practice in the field of international development from the post-WWII period to the present. Students will consider theoretical debates in the context of changing geographies of global inequality and the shifting role played by multilateral development institutions, such as the World Bank and the IMF. Students will explore contemporary development practice in an era of increased reliance on market mechanisms to achieve social development goals in low-income countries. Case studies include titling programs for informal urban settlements, agro-food export restructuring, microfinance, and gender mainstreaming. For questions please contact Dr. Marion Werner, 716-645-0475; wernerm@buffalo.edu.

GEO 512 Geography of Health

This course provides an introduction to a variety of geographic dimensions of health. Readings are taken from the current literature so that students are up-to-date with respect to the latest findings in this rapidly changing field.

MED 870 International Health

Students interested in overseas work in developing countries during their fourth year should begin planning their experience no later than the beginning of the third year. The Division of Geographic Medicine has contacts in Africa, Asia and South America, which students should discuss with the staff. Many other opportunities exist. In order to obtain credit for this elective, students must plan their program with the University at Buffalo staff. Correspondence between supervisory staff at the field site and the faculty of the Division of Geographic Medicine, including evaluation of the student's performance, is mandatory. Field sites should offer the following: (1) supervision by physicians medically qualified or approved by the country; (2) stable patient care base (outpatient clinic, hospital, mobile outpatient unit); (3) adequate subsistence, safety, and housing.

MED 871 Geographic Medicine

An introduction to medical anthropology and geography and an intensive review of the communicable and nutritional diseases found in isolated populations, in developing countries and among the disadvantaged. Intended for students planning to work overseas or among ethnic isolates in North America. The objectives of the course are to provide students with sufficient background in ethnography, anthropornetry and geography to prepare for clinical work in urban ghettos, squafter settlements, rural communities, etc. Faculty includes individuals from the departments of Medicine, Social and Preventive Medicine and Anthropology. Course work will consist of lectures and seminars, case presentations, field trips to rural and inner city sites and laboratories.

NTR 568 Epidemiology of Public Health for Health Professionals

Cross-listed with ES 568
The purpose of this course is to provide students in Health Professions degree programs an introduction to epidemiology and a foundational knowledge of public health concepts. Students will learn basic epidemiologic principles and methods and apply them to current public health issues, particularly those related to their discipline. Topics include an overview and history of public health, how epidemiologic methods have evolved over time to help us study disease, the natural history and transmission of disease, investigation of an outbreak, basic epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association and risk, criteria used to assess causal relationships in health, and basic principles of population screening and surveillance.

PHM 561 Global Health Outreach

This course is designed to expose students to issues surrounding global health including what world interdependence means, considerations in treating noncommunicable diseases in low-income countries, pharmacists' role/servant leadership, concerns and regulations regarding medication use and acquisition outside the USA, and opportunities that exist for pharmacists in global health. Students will also be exposed to possible opportunities to participate in global health outreach such as medical mission trips, advanced rotation experiences, and short-term trips.

SW 542 Perspectives on Trauma and Human Rights

Through this course, you will be able to deepen your understanding of perspectives and approaches that can be taken to understand trauma and uphold human rights. Emphasis is placed on facilitating integrative and complex analyses of concepts and skills introduced in the foundation year. The course content offers a survey of diverse ways of conceptualizing, researching, preventing and redressing trauma and human rights violations.

SW 569 Community Social Work

As agents of change it is crucial that social workers are able to enter a community or organization and identify how individual actors both influence and are influenced by the environment in which they operate in order to sustain a desired change. This course examines the theories, research and interventions that social workers utilize in community practice. Community practitioners define the scope of their practice in the context of social justice within organizations, neighborhoods and communities applying social values and the concepts of welfare economics in the selection of culturally sensitive strategies and appropriate interventions. Utilizing a trauma informed and human rights perspective they seek to improve the lives of people through purposeful change in their communities. The context of their practice includes but is not limited to housing, safety, environment (e.g., water, sewage and air), education and employment.

SW 570 Health and Disability

This course examines policy, theory, research and practice issues related to health and disabilities across the life span. The course focuses on problem definition and policy-guided service provision in a variety of health settings utilizing trauma-informed, human rights perspectives when relevant. The course illustrates multiple roles that social workers take across settings when working with those with acute and chronic health problems. Central to this course is an understanding of historical policy formations at national, regional and local levels, particularly as they influence current practice. Students will examine multiple levels of response to deterioration in health and adaptive abilities. Students will develop evidence-based knowledge and skills associated with direct practice as well as critical advocacy roles to ensure access to services, reasonable accommodations, and legal remedies related to discrimination, oppression, and human rights violations for those with health related disabilities. The effect of social location and situation will be examined as they influence access to health services. This advanced year course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to be effective practitioners in a variety of micro, mezzo or macro health practice realities

SW 572 Mental Health and Disability in Social Work

In this course, students will examine policy, theory, research and practice issues related to mental health and disabilities across the life span. The course focuses on problem definition and service provision in mental health settings within the context of social policies and practices, including the multiple roles social workers take across settings when working with people with acute or severe and persistent mental health problems. Central to this course will be an understanding, from a trauma-informed, human rights perspective, of historical policy formations at national, regional and local levels, particularly as they influence current practice realities. Students will examine multiple levels of response to deterioration in mental health and adaptive abilities. Students will be provided with evidence-based knowledge and skills associated with direct practice and critical advocacy roles to ensure access to services, reasonable accommodations, and legal remedies related to discrimination, oppression, and human rights violations for those with mental health disabilities. The effect of social location and situation will be examined as they relate to access to mental health services. This advanced year course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to be effective as practitioners in a variety of micro, mezzo or macro mental health practice realities.

SW 582 Multicultural Issues in Social Work

Buffalo is becoming more diverse in terms of culture and ethnic background as the WNY region attracts people from all over the world. This course will explore the cultures and value systems of some of the major ethnic groups found within the U.S., discuss the impact of culture on help seeking behavior, assessment, intervention, and the termination process, and recognize the importance of working with informal support networks and indigenous helpers as part of the social work process. For questions contact Dr. Isok Kim, 716-645-1252; isokkim@buffalo.edu.

SW 714 International Social Work

In our globalized world, effective social work practice requires incorporation of an international perspective and an understanding of the connections between global and local issues. The purpose of this course is to examine critical global social issues, policies and social welfare institutions in different regions of the world with special attention to human rights and the process of globalization and its effect on social welfare and human need. A key premise of the course is to recognize the value conflicts that influence global and international social interventions. The role of international organizations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in shaping international welfare policy and services is also explored.

SW 992 Community Health Interventions

This advanced practice course focuses on providing evidence-based public health social work interventions in healthcare settings on behalf of individuals living with acute and chronic health conditions. Using trauma-informed care and human rights perspectives, this course will investigate the social, behavioral, and medical issues that negatively affect the provision of healthcare services to individuals, families, groups, and communities; and the practice methods public health social workers can use to ameliorate them. Students will develop engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills needed to be effective public heath social workers employed in a variety of settings including Veterans Administration facilities, maternal and child health clinics, STD clinics, and umbrella organizations such as the Multiple Sclerosis Society and the American Cancer Society. Students will develop additional strategies needed for effective community action including community-based participatory research for effective work with individuals, families, groups, and communities.

URP 605 Built Environment and Public Health

The discipline of planning claims to improve the welfare of people and their communities by creating more convenient, equitable, healthful, efficient, and attractive places for present and future generations yet is rarely explicitly addressed in traditional planning practice. A growing body of evidence suggests that social and environmental determinants--shaped by planning--play a key role in public health outcomes, especially in the recent increase in chronic disease in the United States. This graduate seminar is about exploring the possibilities, limits, and challenges of planning and designing communities to promote public health.

AAS 312 Gender Issues in Contemporary Africa

This seminar examines current policy frameworks and agendas such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and public policy responses to poverty, gender inequalities in democratic participation and socioeconomic development. It further interrogates burning issues of human rights and the rights of the girl child as they pertain to social practices such as female mutilation and child soldiers. It analyzes also the changing dynamics of households due to the combined effects of transnational migration, HIV/Aids and conflicts and their gender implications. It revisits opportunities for social change in the face of an increased pressure from globalization, environmental degradation, a growing retrenchment of the state, and many threats to human security

AMS 260 Women and Health

APY 106 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Surveys important ideas about culture and society that have shaped cultural anthropology. Studies the principal institutions of culture - language, social organization, religion, economics, politics, artistic expression, etc. - in their traditional ethnographic context and as they change through cultural contact and modernization.

APY 248 Human Genetics

Examines contemporary human genetics relevant to families and society, including genetic diseases, family planning and demography, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, genetic engineering, and genetics and the law. Provides students with sufficient understanding of contemporary human genetics to intelligently address these issues.

APY 275 Introduction to Medical Anthropology

This course uses ecological, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives to study human health. Topics covered include the ecology and epidemiology of disease; genetic, physiological, and cultural adaptation; nutrition; pregnancy and childbirth; stress; culture change; and health disparities in both developing and developed countries. Health issues associated with globalization and increased military conflict will also be covered. Supplementary readings deal with maternal health, midwifery, and childrens health and nutrition in Africa and illustrate the biocultural approach to health.

APY 321 Sex, Gender and Culture

This course offers a study of the intersections among sex, gender, and culture. Questions we will explore include the following: What is the difference between sex and gender? How do we come to consider and express ourselves as men and women? Why are such distinctions important in today?s world and what challenges do we encounter when we do not conform to gender norms? How does religion affect gender relations? The course has a heavy focus on North America, but we will also consider materials about Africa, Europe, India, and Latin America. The course will enable students to think openly and critically about controversial contemporary issues that stem from gender differences, such as the issues of same-sex marriage and non-traditional families, understand how gender roles are socially constructed and produce inequality, interrogate the relation between slavery and gender, explore how immigration affects gender relations, and examine the impact of modernization on men and women.

APY 394 Religion and Healing in Native South America

Surveys the contemporary religions and healing practices of Native South Americans through the ethnographies of a variety of South American groups. Explores Native South American concepts of time, space, power, order, destruction, and renewal and their manifestations in birth, initiation, healing, and death rituals. Attempts to understand different worldviews and practices that help us rethink our way of conceiving the world and our role in it.

CIE 341 Environmental Engineering Science

CIE 341 covers basic concepts of microbiology and chemistry and their links to applications in environmental engineering, including, but not limited to, water and wastewater treatment, hazardous waste management, and ecology. Content is closely coordinated with CIE 340 Environmental Engineering, taught in fall semester of the sophomore year, which serves as the introduction to CIE 341.

CIE 447 Sustainability

Engineering policy dimensions of sustainability. Topics include: (1) definitions and concepts of "sustainability," (2) introduction to climate change science and policy, and (3) relevant analytical tools such as life cycle assessment and carbon footprint analysis. Student teams will conduct studies that integrate environmental, economic, and social concerns in an engineering context, with a strong emphasis on oral and written communications.

COM 202 Intercultural Communication

Explores cultural factors that impinge upon the process of human communication; gives attention to nonverbal and verbal factors, as well as international mass media.

ECO 412 Environmental Economics

Examines uses of the natural environment; their respective costs and benefits (and distributions thereof), and the problem of policy design to optimize environmental use and quality.

ECO 416 Economic Development

Studies the issues of poverty, economic development, and economic growth in low-income countries. Introduces diverse aspects of empirical findings in development and offers theories of development and policy implications.

END 308 Health and Urban Environments

Explores current health issues found in urban and physical environments. Examines diverse public health conditions, including environmentally-caused diseases, pollution-related diseases, aging populations, and the globalization of illness. Considers various community-based social and physical environmental solutions. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

ES 428 Health Promotion, Prevention & Wellness

Examines health promotion from a public health perspective, a community and corporate perspective, and in terms of individual behavior change.

GEO 333 International Trade

Involves a theoretical and empirical study of the spatial aspects of commodity flows among countries and regions; also examines conditions leading to trade, and to barriers to the movement of goods.

GEO 334 International Business

Introduces students to the interconnections among culture, social expectations, and international business. Covers cross-cultural communication and negotiation, cross-cultural management and alliance formation, and corporate social and environmental responsibility. The course is designed to challenge students to understand difference and to overcome stereotypes in thinking about the operation of business in different parts of the world.

GEO 460 Geography of Development

Examines how regions, cities, and countries are engaged in economic, political, and institutional strategies in order to tackle problems related to poverty, underdevelopment, economic decline, and/or economic stagnation. Attention is given to the influences of local and global forces, actors, and policies on regional and national competition and development.

GEO 481 Geographical Information Systems

Provides a general introduction to the principles and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). The lectures cover several fundamental aspects of GIS: (1) the basics of a GIS system, (2) GIS data and sources of data, (3) GIS analysis functions, and (4) GIS applications and related issues. The laboratory exercises are based on the leading GIS software, ArcGIS, and are designed to help students understand the lecture materials and gain hands-on experiences in GIS data acquisition, spatial database management, spatial analysis, and mapping.

GGS 225 Violence in a Gendered World

Surveys components in the spectrum of gender-based violence, in the U.S. and in some other countries. Historical, legal, sociological, psychological, literary and first person accounts comprise the course readings. Students will gain an understanding of the dynamics of violence against women and children, social movements that attempt to ameliorate it, and how gender, race, class and theoretical grounding influence local, national and global efforts to end violence and empower women.

GGS 241 Women in Developing Countries

Survey of women's socio-economic and political status in developing counties. Examination of policies and practices that shape their lives, as well as discourses that construct their experiences. Analyzes women's organizing, advocacy and social mobilization to engender change and equity. Introduction to a broad, interdisciplinary and international literature focusing on current and emerging issues related to women's work and globalization; poverty and inequality; displacement and environmental degradation; social practices such as female genital mutilation; and HIV/AIDS, within national, regional, and global contexts. Course will dwell on a variety of teaching material such as videos, life histories, case studies and policy documents combined with authoritative scholarly sources. The course will combine lectures and discussions, as well as creative projects to promote an interactive learning environment, and to encourage critical thinking among students in analyzing salient issues and theories pertinent to women's conditions in developing countries, and strategies to effect social change.

GGS 260 Women's Health

Reviews the health care system in the U.S. and its treatment of women. Content includes a history of health care and the changing definition of "health", the current roles of women in this system, and the intersection of the legal system on women's bodies and women's health. Women in the 1970's and beyond started examining the politics of health care, which exploded into the millennium such as cost containment and restruction of services through managed care; newer and more expensive technologies; growing consumer dissatisfaction with the current system; and trends towards holistic and alternative care outside of the "mainstream" health care system. Develops an analysis of the current system with a rational plan for improving health care for all women. Addresses the roles that women have played in relation to health and health care, the history of women as healers, the shift to women as patients and consumers, and women as workers, both paid and unpaid, in the system of care.

GGS 316 Gender Issues in Contemporary Africa

MIC 401 Biomedical Microbiology

Medical Microbiology is a course designed to prepare students for training in the allied health professions and nursing. With a medical focus, the course will cover the basics of microbiology and immunology including causes of disease, antimicrobial agents, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance, vaccination, monitoring of disease, microbial transmission, and universal precautions to prevent disease spread. The laboratory portion of the course will include basic microbiological techniques and demonstrations of current clinical testing coupled with the development of differential diagnostic decision-making skills learned in small group clinical case study format.

NBS 378 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention within Pop

NSG 295 Statistics for Health Care

NSG 309 Health Assessment: Concepts and Skills

Prepares students to perform a health assessment on an adult and child. Emphasizes a systematic and comprehensive health assessment as a database for identifying nursing diagnoses. Highlights developmental aspects, sociocultural influences, health-illness perceptions, normal variations of health-status findings, and documentation throughout the course. Students become familiar with the use of assessment instruments through practice in a supervised on-campus laboratory. Must be taken in program sequence.

NSG 393 Informatics and the Health Care Environment

Introduces students to the health care environment emphasizing the interface between the health care delivery system and informatics. Explores various environments where people obtain health care, including clinics, hospitals, and community settings. Students become familiar with health care terminology, government health policies, and the influence of managed care organizations on the health care environment.

NSG 481 Nursing Mgmt. of Patients with Complex Acute Health Care Problems

Reviews knowledge and skills required to care for patients throughout their life spans who have complex, life-threatening health problems, including trauma, problems with oxygenation, disruptions of the nervous system, and disruption of the immune system. Emphasizes assessment skills and nursing interventions to restore physiological and psychological stability. Must be taken in program sequence.

PSC 332 International Organizations

Examines the United Nations, specialized agencies, and other intergovernmental organizations in peacekeeping, economic development, and social welfare; also studies regional integration.

PSC 430 Human Rights

Examines the development, primarily since World War II, of international systems for the promotion and protection of human rights.

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology

General survey of perception; learning and memory; cognitive, developmental, personality, abnormal, and social psychology; and behavioral neuroscience. Requires participation in research or a short paper. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade other than W may repeat the course in the summer or only in the fall or spring semester with a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' Office.

PSY 325 Health Psychology

Introduces the scientific study of the behavioral and social aspects of health.

PSY 437 Cross-Cultural Psychology

Examines the difference in concepts of the self, interpersonal processes, and group processes across cultures.

PSY 451 Drug Addiction

The scientific study of drug addiction, emphasizing biological and psychological theories.

SOC 311 Drugs and Society

Examines the relationship between drugs and social context. Understanding this relationship is critical for gaining insight into why, despite the risks, people find consciousness alteration meaningful; what kinds of experiences and problems arise from their use, and what types of social policies emerge in attempts to control use. Specific areas of interest will include: shifting perspectives on drug usage in society, the emergence of drug crusades and drug legislation in America, the difference between 'licit' and 'illicit' drugs and why they become defined as such, the use and misuse of various substances, the relationship between drug use and crime, the prevention and treatment of alcohol and drug problems, and current domestic and international drug control policies.

SOC 324 Sociology of Immigration

The United States is an immigrant nation; understanding migration experiences is central to understanding ourselves. This course provides a sociological framework for exploring historical and contemporary immigration, primarily (but not exclusively) to the United States. We use theories of international migration to understand how and why people move from one country or region to another; to explore the immigrant experience in terms of social, economic, and spatial adaptation; and to consider racial and ethnic experiences of migration past, present, and future.

SOC 322 Medical Sociology

Provides an overview of the theories and empirical research that reflect how sociologists think about, research, and analyze medical issues, medical workers and patients, health and illness, and the social organization of health care.

SSC 218 Issues in Mental Health

Identifies community mental health service components and explores trends and issues in the delivery of mental health services.

SSC 407 Health Care and the Elderly

Provides students an opportunity to explore relevant issues in dealing with an elderly population in the health-care arena. Special focus on the frail elderly and aged with chronic medical conditions. Points of interest include incapacitaion, consents, confidentiality, ancillary and other services, rites of passage, the health-care team, managing the difficult patient, lethality assessments, family/professional relationships, health-care settings and intercultural communication.

SSC 420 Child Mental Health

Examines the human service system as it affects the mental health needs of children; also addresses specific needs of special groups.

STA 119 Statistical Methods

Covers topics in descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and experimental design, all of which are put together to draw conclusions from uncertainty through analysis of experimental data. Although a general statistical methods course, the material (through examples) is geared towards sciences majors, especially those in the health sciences. Looks into the underlying reasoning behind the techniques rather than just pure application.

CHB 502 Health Behavior Change

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Health Behavior Change is an overview of the health behaviors contributing most dramatically to increased morbidity and mortality in the United States. The course emphasizes public health interventions and strategies to promote healthy behaviors and discourage unhealthy behaviors. The course examines consequences, patterns, risk factors, and change/interventions for each behavior or problem. Behaviors are examined from multiples perspectives (e.g., individual, social, environmental) and with a systems perspective in mind, illuminating the interconnecting influences on behaviors. Health behaviors and behavior change interventions are presented in the context of current research and theory. The course also examines the role of health disparities, public health policy, current debate, health behavior theory and emerging research.

Instructor: Kozlowski, Collins

CHB 538 Community Health Assessment and Surveillance

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

This course identifies elements in a community responsible for modifying the health behavior of the individual. Provides the needed information for designing plans to improve the health status of the community and its members. The course will help to identify quantitative and qualitative methods to conduct community health assessment, evaluation of community intervention programs, and the utilization of public health surveillance data to understand community health profiles. Case-studies and a practical experience will provide the students with training on how to work as a group with members of the community.

Instructor: Rowe

CHB 602 Community Health and Health Behavior Intervention

3 Credits, Spring Semester

This course is a designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the state of the science in health behavior and community health interventions, including individual, family, community, and policy interventions. Students will be prepared to critically assess and apply strategies for individual and community health promotion. 

Instructor: Orom

CHB 625 Health Disparities

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Health Disparities is a PhD-level elective designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the social determinants of health. The course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to examining differences in health status associated with race, ethnicity, education, income, disability, geographic location, gender, and sexual orientation. We will examine the multiple pathways through which these differences are produced and reinforced, including discrimination, stigma, social network processes, culture, and health care experiences. We will also discuss methods for conducting research and intervening in disadvantaged communities. The course will provide historical and theoretical perspectives on the problem, provide a critical examination of empirical support for various explanatory pathways, and will cover approaches to studying and reducing health disparities. The course will prepare students to conduct independent research on health disparities and health-related research with disadvantaged communities, satisfying many of the Community Health and Health Behavior PhD competencies.

Instructor: Orom

EEH 500 Introduction to Epidemiology

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to principles and methods of epidemiology. The course emphasizes the conceptual aspects of epidemiologic investigation and application of these concepts in public health and related professions. Topics include overview of the epidemiologic approach to studying disease; the natural history of disease; measures of disease occurrence, association and risk; epidemiologic study designs; disease surveillance; population screening; interpreting epidemiologic associations; causal inference using epidemiologic information; and application of these basic concepts in the context of selected major diseases and risk factors. Please note that this course cannot be used for degrees that require EEH 501 or as a prerequisite for courses that require EEH 501.

Instructor: Zorich

EEH 596 Special Topics

3 Credits, Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer Semesters

Prerequisite: None

Special topics for master’s students (MS and MPH) determined by individual faculty interest.

Instructor: Staff

EEH 537 Public Health Law

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Provides an understanding of how the law serves as a tool in advancing a public health agenda. The class is interdisciplinary, including law students and students from public health-related fields. The course examines the history of public health law, the tension between state and federal governments in the regulation of the public's health, and the conflicts between governmental powers and individual autonomy. The course considers the standard practice of public health professionals to prevent disease and promote healthy behaviors in the wake of emerging public health challenges such as racial disparities in health care, a potential flu pandemic, the obesity epidemic, and the abortion debate.

Instructor: Staff

Note

Cross listed with LAW 618

EEH 539 The Business of Health Care

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to be an overview of the health care industry and a framing of the severe challenges facing leaders in field. It will take a business approach to the issues presented, but will always juxtapose financial issues with value creation. It begins with a short look at classic economics, and why they do not always apply in health care. It will take an in-depth look at the Patient Protection and Afford .. 1ble Care Act, and the implications it has on all parts of the industry. It will follow with a review of each component of the industry: government, health plans, employers, providers, and suppliers. Each review will focus on the unique challenges leaders are facing in a dynamic, changing environment.

Instructor: Staff

Note

Cross listed with MGH 641

EEH 551 Advanced Environmental Health Sciences

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisites: EEH 501 and EEH 550

Advanced course designed to provide students with the latest knowledge and an in-depth discussion of how the environment interacts with human biological systems and potentiates various health effects over the life cycle. The course includes a detailed examination of environmental hazards, exposure assessment, human susceptibility, biological response pathways, application of biomarkers in environmental health studies and the disease burden of environmental exposure. The course focuses on three major environmental topics: air pollution, water pollution and food safety.

Instructor: Ren

GEO 506 Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to the use of high-speed digital computers in geographic research. Topics include advanced programming, introductory machine architecture, large file handling and data base management systems, computer graphics and digitizing. Students are expected to complete a major applications programming project as part of the course requirement.

GEO 612 Space-time Analysis

This graduate level course will focus on the quantitative treatment of space-time data for sue in the environmental and health sciences. Selected topics will include: Space-time data representation, visualization and analysis; exploratory space-time analysis; space-time cluster analysis; case-control clustering for mobile populations; regression with time-dynamic spatial data including spatial lag, spatial error, geographically weighted, and spatial multilevel regression models; and multivariate analysis with space-time data. Course topics are selected by the students and faculty and, therefore, may vary.

GEO 625 Global Business Landscapes

This seminar reviews a broad range of empirical and theoretical trends in the recent literature on industrial geography. Topics covered include flexible manufacturing systems, corporate outsourcing, vertical integration/disintegration, collaborative networks, industrial districts and the role of producer services in technological innovation

GEO 634 International Business Cultures

This course provides an introduction to a variety of geographic dimensions of health. Readings are taken from the current literature so that students are up-to-date with respect to the latest findings in this rapidly changing field.

NGC 509 Ethics for Health Professionals

This course prepares graduate students to identify and address multiple ethical issues arising within professional practice and the dynamic health care delivery system. With the use of ethical theories and principles the student will apply ethical decision making models to address dilemmas within practice, health care systems, and global communities. This course is designed to provide strategies for promoting ethical practice and developing ethical leadership within the technological health care environment.

NGC 518 Health Promotion and Epidemiologic Methods

This course examines the health behaviors and health promotion needs of individuals, families, and populations. Strategies to promote positive health behaviors and to reduce health risks are discussed. Theoretical, developmental, sociocultural, and demographic factors for selected health promotion strategies are analyzed for use in formulating appropriate interventions to maximize health.

SW 503 Diversity and Oppression

3 credits

This is a core course in the foundation curriculum. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to examine issues of diversity in social work practice with individuals, families, groups and social systems. The effects of race, class, gender, gender expression, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability and national origin are examined as they relate to interpersonal, intergroup and intersystem power struggles and differences. Central to this course will be an examination of the beliefs and values that individuals bring to expectations of self and others as they interact within the context of race, class, gender, gender expression, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability and national origin. This course will provide students with an opportunity to engage in self examination of those expectations that they and others bring to all levels and settings of practice. The concerns that emerge in multicultural environments are explored to encourage students to understand the historical, political and sociological realities of perceived and genuine differences. Exposure to the impact of ethnocentrism, bias, prejudice and discrimination will be a central aspect of student learning. In particular, the course will provide students with an understanding of how these complex dynamics can influence access to and utilization of social systems and agency services. The contribution of this course to the overall core foundation/advanced year curricula will be addressed.

SW 557 Evidence Based Mental Health Practice (Online Course)

3 credits

This course is aimed at developing the knowledge and skills necessary for working with individuals who have a diagnosis of serious mental illness using recovery-oriented evidence-based practices. It is designed for MSW students and MSW mental health practitioners. Students will become familiar with evidence-based practice, within a recovery-oriented paradigm, as a general approach to practice as well as specific evidence-based interventions to use for individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness. Students will learn to examine research literature to determine the various levels of support for specific interventions and essential principles for translating research into practice.

SW 559 Trauma Theory and Treatment

3 credits

This course will provide an introduction of theoretical frameworks of trauma throughout the life span. An overview of types of trauma and the impacts of trauma on the individual, family and community will be examined. Information on treatment methods, clinical applications and evidence-based practices used to address and treat trauma will be provided.

This course is recommended for students interested in taking SW 593 EMDR in the spring.

SW 569 Community Social Work

3 credits

This course examines the theories, research and interventions that social workers utilize in community practice. Community practitioners define the scope of their practice in the context of social justice within organizations, neighborhoods and communities applying social values and the concepts of welfare economics. They seek to improve the lives of people through purposeful change in their communities. The context of their practice includes but is not limited to housing, safety, environment (e.g., water, sewage, air), education and employment. As agents of change it is crucial that social workers are able to enter a community or organization and identify how individual actors both influence and are influenced by the environment in which they operate for in the end community practice is all about sustaining a desired change. To that end, this course is designed to build on the student's knowledge of policy, its implementation through public programs and its implications for social work practice.

Neighborhood models, the assessment of these and their influence on selection of appropriate interventions are discussed.

SW 570 Health and Disability Social Work

3 credits

This course examines policy, theory, research and practice issues related to health and disabilities across the life span. The course focuses on problem definition and evidence-based service provision in a variety of health settings utilizing a trauma-informed, human rights perspective when relevant, within the context of social policies and macro-level practices. The course illustrates multiple roles that social workers take across settings when working with those with acute and chronic health conditions. Central to this course is an understanding of historical policy formations at national, regional and local levels, particularly as they influence current practice realities. Students will examine multiple levels of response to deterioration in health and adaptive abilities. Students will develop understanding of health policy based on critical advocacy roles that social workers play in ensuring equitable access to services, reasonable accommodations, and legal remedies related to discrimination, oppression, and human rights violations for those with health-related disabilities. The effect of social location and context will be examined as they influence access to health services. This advanced year course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to be effective practitioners across a variety of micro, mezzo or macro health practice realities. 

SW 572 Mental Health and Disability Social Work

3 credits


In this course, students will examine policy, theory, research, and practice issues related to mental health disabilities across the lifespan. The course focuses on problem definition and evidence-based service provision in mental health settings, utilizing a trauma-informed, human rights perspective when relevant, within the context of social policies and macro-level practices. The course illustrates multiple roles social workers take across settings when working with people with acute or severe and persistent mental illnesses. Central to this course is an understanding of historical policy formations at national, regional, and local levels, particularly as they influence current practice realities.  Students will examine multiple levels of response to deterioration in mental health and adaptive abilities. Students will examine multiple levels of response to deterioration in mental health and adaptive abilities. Students will develop understanding of mental health policy based on critical advocacy roles that social workers play in ensuring equitable access to services, reasonable accommodations, and legal remedies related to discrimination, oppression, and human rights violations for those with mental health-related disabilities. The effect of social location and context will be examined as they influence access to mental health services. This advanced year course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to be effective practitioners across micro, mezzo, or macro mental health practice realities. 

SW 578 Gender Issues

3 credits

This course aims to introduce the student to the theory and knowledge essential to an understanding of gender issues in social work practice. The course will cover: current theories of normal bio-psycho-social development, bio-psycho-social factors that affect the mental health of men and women, theories of the etiology of mental disorders prevalent among women as compared to men, and the effects of race, ethnicity and diversity on gender development.

SW 586 Responding to Refugees/Immigrants

3 credits

Refugees and immigrants are increasingly being recognized as populations with issues and concerns of relevance to social workers. This course will cover issues such as distinctions between immigrants, refugees and other immigration statuses; reasons for migration (economic reasons, wars, persecution, etc.); the societal context that welcomes or rejects different types of migrants; policies related to immigration and the value foundation of these policies; and resettlement issues, advocacy, direct practice issues and trauma. Many refugees are currently being resettled in Buffalo, thus the course will examine locally relevant content as well as looking at global issues.

SW 708 Responding to Disasters with SW Interventions

3 credits

Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for responding to disasters, such as floods, fires, hurricanes and major transportation accidents. Students will become oriented to trauma-informed casework, mental health interventions and shelter-based interventions that are utilized by disaster response teams, such as rapid assessment skills; enhanced psychological first-aid for survivors, staff and volunteers; and facilitation of immediate problem-solving. The course is anchored in the values and ethics of the social work profession and incorporates a human rights perspective in understanding disasters and their differential impact on vulnerable populations.

SW 714 International Social Work

3 credits

The purpose of this course is to examine critical global social issues, policies and social welfare institutions in different regions the world with special attention to human rights and the process of globalization and its effect on social welfare and human need. Specific topics covered include women in developing countries, child welfare and child labor, migration and refugees, and the impact of HIV in the developing world. The role of international organizations, such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the United Nations (UN) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), in shaping international welfare policy and services is also explored. The underlying premise and values within the course is the need to strengthen and enhance social welfare systems in the face of globalization, to recognize social work as a global profession, to associate human rights with social welfare and social work practice, and to recognize value conflicts that influence global and international social interventions.

SW 715 Advanced Seminar in Trauma

3 credits

In this course, students will explore in depth the theoretical and empirical status of historical and current issues in trauma theory, research and practice, as it relates to human-perpetrated trauma. The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with a knowledge base regarding a range of important topics in the area of trauma and the opportunity to explore their own areas of interest in trauma research or practice.

SW 717 Human Sexuality for Social Workers

3 credits

This graduate course will focus on integrating human sexuality issues into social work practice. Students will examine current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in addressing human sexuality issues across the lifespan. The course will explore the historical, political and cultural contexts of human sexuality, incorporating a trauma-informed and human rights perspective on sexuality. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness of the diversity in sexual values, attitudes and behavioral expressions found among client systems and increased knowledge and skills in assessing and intervening with issues related to human sexuality that may present in social work practice.

SW 990 Trauma Informed Child Welfare Practice

3 credits

In this course, students will apply the core concepts of trauma to the child welfare system.  Students will consider strategies for identifying protective factors to reduce the adverse impact of trauma for children and families in the child welfare system. Trauma is broadly defined and includes children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events, such as abuse and neglect, witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence), experiencing community violence and other traumatic events.  Using a unique case-based, hands-on learning approach (through Problem-based Learning), students will work through detailed child welfare cases by applying the best evidence about the identification and impact of trauma on children and their families.   Students will gain knowledge about the role of child development and culture in implementing trauma-specific assessments and interventions with children, youth and families in a child welfare context.

Students should not plan to take both this course and SW 992 Core Concepts in Trauma Treatment for Children and Adolescents, as there is significant overlap.

SW 995 Disability and Human Rights through the Lens of Social Work and Law

3 credits

This interdisciplinary course integrates the conceptual frameworks, knowledge bases, and practice skills of both law and social work to examine disability rights in a comparative, international perspective.  The course is designed to orient students to a rights based approach to practice.

URP 505 Urban Planning and Environmental Change

URP 508 Race Class and Gender

URP 527 Global Perspectives in Historical Preservation

URP 576 Comparative International Development Planning

URP 604 Food Systems Planning

Food arrives from farms to our plates having traveled through a complicated system. How well does this system work? What are the impacts of the food system on public health, the economy, and the environment? How can public policy, planning and design tools be used to strengthen a community’s food infrastructure? How can you make a difference in people’s lives? Students from all disciplines are welcome. No prior experience in food systems or planning/public policy is necessary.

URP 605 Built Environment and Health

Studies theories, concepts, and practices of housing and community development, emphasizing neighborhood planning and design in urban environments. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.