Exercise Science BS/MS

Combine undergraduate and graduate education with the ultimate wellness degree.

Our students develop a strong foundation in anatomy, exercise physiology, biomechanics, neuroscience, exercise prescription, and exercise nutrition through rigorous coursework. The science-based curriculum prepares graduates to work with individuals across the lifespan to promote healthy lifestyle changes through basic interventions and referrals.

Graduates are well prepared and encouraged to take a national certification exam, such as the ACSM Certified Exercise Physiologist (EP-C) or the NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). Students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with faculty on ongoing research projects.

The BS/MS in ES provides students with the opportunity to earn both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years. Students are well-prepared for positions in health/fitness, cardiac rehab, injury prevention, wellness, and strength and conditioning.

Learning Outcomes

The BS/MS in Exercise Science prepares graduates for entry-level and managerial positions in the areas of fitness, health and wellness, sport performance/strength and conditioning, and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Students apply the scientific principles of exercise conditioning to design exercise programs to enhance the well-being of individuals.

Skills gained in this program include managing, organizing and meeting deadlines, analyzing, critical thinking, teaching, interpreting, communicating, persuading/influencing, coordinating, planning, problem solving, and coaching.

Upon successful completion of all requirements, the student will be able to:

  • Design and prescribe exercise programs for individuals across the lifespan to restore health, maintain optimal well-being, and enhance sports performance 
  • Pass a national certification exam (ACSM, NSCA) 
  • Demonstrate problem solving, professionalism, critical thinking and communication
  • Conduct basic and applied research in exercise science