Course Descriptions

ES 310 Exercise Assessment, Prescription and Programming I

4 Credits, Fall Semester

The theoretical and practical aspects of exercise testing, body composition, fitness evaluation, client interviews and education, exercise prescription, emergency procedures, program administration, and management are examined in this two-semester course

ES 330 Lifespan Physiology

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Focuses on motor development, neural control of movement, learning, and memory throughout the life span, with special reference to pediatrics and geriatrics.

ES 340 Physical Activity for Special Cases

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Analysis of exercise responses, testing and prescription, and adaptation to chronic physical activity in special populations, including cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, work hardening, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, pregnancy, and others.

ES 341 Critical Analysis of Scientific Literature

2 Credits, Fall Semester

This course is competency based and emphasizes basic skills in critical analysis and assessment of professional literature pertinent to the exercise sciences.

ES 342 Neuroscience I

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Principles and content of functional neuroanatomy and neurology. Presentation of neuron cytology, central nervous system development and organization, motor structures, pathways, and control of movement.

ES 343 Neuroscience II

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Principles and content of functional neuroanatomy and neurology. Presentation of neuron cytology, central nervous system development and organization, motor structures, pathways, and control of movement.

ES 370 Biomechanical Dimensions

4 Credits, Spring Semester

Introduction to the mechanical, neuromuscular, and anatomical bases of human movement. Quantitative and qualitative biomechanical analyses of multisegment motion is analyzed from the perspective of joint and muscle mechanics, kinematics, and kinetics.

ES 380 Exercise Physiology

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Analysis of physiologic responses and adaptations of the various body systems and structures to acute and chronic physical activity and to environmental stress. Cellular mechanisms that underlie these responses are emphasized.

ES 410 Exercise Assessment, Prescription and Programming II

3 Credits, Fall Semester

The theoretical and practical aspects of exercise testing, body composition, fitness evaluation, client interviews and education, exercise prescription, emergency procedures, program administration, and management are examined in this two-semester course.

ES 442 Applications in Exercise Science

1 Credit, Spring Semester

Develops basic competencies necessary for the evaluation and assessment of needs, interests, and performance in comprehensive health-related fitness programming in compliance with American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. Skills training in the administration and interpretation of standard testing/ assessment protocols is provided in both on-and off-campus laboratory settings.

ES 468 Epidemiology and Public Health for Health Professionals

3 Credits, Fall Semester

The purpose of this course is to provide students in Health Professions degree programs an introduction to epidemiology and a foundational knowledge of public health concepts. Students will learn basic epidemiologic principles and methods and apply them to current public health issues, particularly those related to their discipline. Topics include an overview and history of public health, how epidemiologic methods have evolved over time to help us study disease, the natural history and transmission of disease, investigation of an outbreak, basic epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association and risk, criteria used to assess causal relationships in health, and basic principles of population screening and surveillance.

ES 496 Practicum

3 credits, Spring Semester

This course is designed to enhance the skill development and acquisition component of the Exercise Science curriculum by providing students with the opportunity to gain hands on experience in a professional setting.

NTR 301 Dietary Assessment

1 credit, Fall Semester

Prepares students to assess dietary intake of individuals, groups, and populations and how it relates to physical activity. Also prepares students to interpret data arising from dietary assessment

NTR 500 Nutrient Metabolism in Health and Disease

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Covers sources, absorption, availability, metabolism and functions of major nutrients, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The regulatory role of enzymes and hormones in absorption and metabolism of these nutrients will be examined. Methods used to estimate the requirements and Recommended Dietary Allowances for protein and energy will be discussed.

NTR 501 Vitamins and Minerals

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Will examine in depth the sources, absorption, availability, metabolism and functions of micronutrients (minerals and vitamins). The interaction between minerals and vitamins will be discussed. Methods used to determine requirements, Recommended Dietary Allowances or amounts recognized as safe for these nutrients will be discussed.

NTR 503 Nutrition and Health

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Discusses nutrition as an important element for maintaining optimal health. Emphasizes the importance of each nutrient based on its biochemical and physiological functions. Studies nutritional needs at specific stages in the life cycle, as well as the implication of nutrition in major health problems in the United States, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and cancer. Students learn to determine nutritional status through dietary analysis and learn to evaluate nutritional information.

NTR 505 Exercise Nutrition

2 Credits, Fall Semester

This course will cover the main aspects of nutrition as related to exercise and physical performance. These are the energy systems in exercise, nutritional aspects of substrate utilization (digestion, absorption, metabolism, etc), assessment of nutritional needs and diet modification. Dietary development for weight loss, body composition changes and performance will be covered. These topics will be covered from a nutritional view. They will focus on advanced topics not covered in the prerequisites.

NTR 523 Nutrition Assessment

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Considers the scientific basis and methods for determining nutritional status of individuals throughout their lifespan. The lecture series includes: (l) nutritional assessment methods (laboratory indices, anthropometric and dietary methods and standards) (2) nutritional assessment in maternal and child populations at risk; and (3) the epidemiologic and clinical basis for assessing and monitoring major nutritional risks in adults years.

NTR 600 Pathophysiology of Nutrition Related Diseases

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Examines the physiologic and metabolic alterations in chronic and acute illness and  trauma requiring modifications in nutritional care; the current scientific basis for nutrition intervention measures; and the interrelationships between diet, other treatment modalities, and nutritional status.

NTR 630 Seminar

2 Credits, Spring Semester

An introduction to the current literature, this required course familiarizes students with a wide range of topics relating both to nutritional research and clinical care. Students present seminars and participate in discussion. Two credit hours are required.

STA 527 – Introduction to Medical Statistics

4 Credits, Fall Semester

An introductory course in statistical techniques used most frequently in the health related professions. Basic understanding of the mathematical concepts underlying elementary statistical methodology and acquaintance with practical applications and interpretations is the primary focus of this course.