Course Descriptions

On this page:

Required Courses

CHB 501 Study of Health Behavior

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Designed to provide you with a graduate‐level overview of the role of the social and behavioral sciences in understanding and addressing public health problems. Three general topics are covered. First, we examine how psychological, social, and environmental factors influence people’s health and wellbeing. Second, we explore factors that influence health behavior, including individual, social, and environmental/community influences. Third, we explore how understanding behavior and social/environmental influences on health informs public health approaches to improving health and preventing disease. The course prepares public health students to satisfy MPH competencies in social and behavioral sciences.

Instructor: Kiviniemi

EEH 501 Principles of Epidemiology

4 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the basic principles, methods, and uses of epidemiology. This course is a master’s/doctoral level course designed to introduce epidemiology, its methods and its role in public health. A major portion of the course will be devoted to an overview of fundamental epidemiologic methods used in public health research and practice. The student will be familiarized with basic measures used in describing disease frequency in populations. Descriptive and analytic approaches to the study of disease will be explored, and a perspective on the role of epidemiologic methods in health services planning and evaluation will be provided. Problem solving exercises will be used to provide students with an opportunity to tabulate data and apply subject matter developed during lectures and in reading assignments. At the end of the course students should have a general understanding of the uses and limitations of epidemiologic inquiry. This understanding should provide the basis for applying epidemiologic concepts in work-related settings and in other courses in the public health curriculum.

Instructor: LaMonte

EEH 505 Application of Biostatistics to Epidemiology I

1 Credit, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

The course is for students in the public health sciences who seek to develop data analysis skills. The course includes emphasis on the application and interpretation of statistical tests using SAS software in the School of Public Health and Health Professions (SPHHP) Kimball Hall computer laboratory. Students will learn basic methods for data organization and management as well as skills in data exploration, graphical and tabular display. Topics include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing for means, proportions, elementary non-parametric techniques, tests, ANOVA, correlations, linear and logistic regression. The course culminates in group data analysis projects.

Instructor: Ochs-Balcom

EEH 520 Biological Basis of Public Health

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Intended for students with little or no background in the biological sciences and health professions. The course provides a broad overview of public health topics related to human health and disease focusing on disease etiology with particular emphasis on parasitic and microbial infections plus a review of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of selected major organ systems and associated diseases of public health importance.

Instructor: Ochs-Balcom

EEH 530 Introduction to Health Care Organization

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Introduces students to the historical development, structure, operation, and current and future directions of the major components of the American health care delivery system. It examines the ways in which health care services are organized and delivered, the influences that impact health care public policy decisions, factors that determine priorities in financing health care services and the relationship of health care costs to measurable benefits. The course enables students to assess the role of organized efforts to influence health policy formulation, and the contributions of medical technology, research findings, and societal values to the evolving U.S. health care delivery system. Class time is also devoted to exploring emerging policy, ethical and legal dilemmas resulting from medical and technological advances.

Instructor: Noyes

Note

Cross listed with MGH 631 and LAW 718

EEH 531 Administrative Theory and Practice for Public Health Practitioners

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Provides students with an overview of the development of management and leadership concepts within health care organizations. Delves into the strategic and policy issues challenging health care systems (access, financing, defining and quantifying quality, etc.). Provides a practical framework of the professional competencies and skills needed to be an effective administrator within a complex health care system.

Instructor: Staff

EEH 544 MPH Field Training

0-6 Credits, Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer Semesters

Prerequisite: None

Allows students to synthesize the knowledge and skills developed during the academic portion of their program in a practical application setting. Field training experiences vary depending upon the student’s interest and concentration area; experiences need to be approved by the MPH concentration director.

Instructor: Staff

EEH 550 Environmental Health

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Introductory course that explores the role of environmental factors in health with an emphasis on characterization, assessment, and control of environmental hazards. Topics include application of toxicologic and epidemiologic methods in assessing risk and setting exposure limits; the nature of and control of hazards associated with food, water, air, solid and liquid waste, occupation, and radiation; risk communication and management, environmental justice; and environmental laws. The course concludes by examining the impact of human activity, such as energy use and pollution, on the environment and how human-induced environmental change, in turn, impacts public health and that of the planet as a whole.

Instructor: Ren

EEH 551 Advanced Environmental Health Sciences

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisites: EEH 501 and EEH 550

Advanced course designed to provide students with the latest knowledge and an in-depth discussion of how the environment interacts with human biological systems and potentiates various health effects over the life cycle. The course includes a detailed examination of environmental hazards, exposure assessment, human susceptibility, biological response pathways, application of biomarkers in environmental health studies and the disease burden of environmental exposure. The course focuses on three major environmental topics: air pollution, water pollution and food safety.

Instructor: Ren

EEH 590 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Public Health

0-1 Credits, Fall and Spring Semesters

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to major public health issues from a practice-based perspective. Through presentations by public health leaders and practitioners, readings, group discussion, class activities and analyses, students practice integrating concepts to better understand issues, and develop recommendations for responses based on evidence, and ethical and cultural considerations. Primary areas of exploration for this course are ethics, evidence, policies, leadership, collaboration, cultural competence and communication. Course content focuses on major public health issues today, and comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Public Health Association (APHA), World Health Organization (WHO), local and state health departments, community-based organizations, healthcare organizations, and other agencies. 

Instructor: Krytus

EEH 630 MPH Integrative Project

2-3 Credits, Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer Semesters

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

The purpose of the integrative projects is for MPH students to integrate core public health knowledge and skills. It will take the form of a paper prepared during the concluding semester of the student’s program.

Instructor: Staff

PMY 626 Toxicology Principles and Practices

2 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Information from the UB Graduate Academic Schedule.

An introduction to the basic principles and practice of toxicology, including dose-response and toxicokinetic analysis. We will also cover chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, with an emphasis on understanding mechanisms for these responses. An overview of risk assessment will include quantitative aspects of cancer and non-cancer based risk assessments.

View a detailed course description on the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology website.

Instructor: Olson

PMY 627 Toxicology at Target Organs

2 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

Information from the UB Graduate Academic Schedule.

This course takes a systemic approach to toxicology, including developmental toxicology. We will investigate the adverse effects of several classes of chemicals at specific target organs, including the liver, lung and kidney, and the endocrine, nervous, reproductive and immune systems. The course emphasizes understanding the mechanism(s) for the adverse responses of specific agents at a given target site.

View a detailed course description on the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology website.

Instructor: Olson

Elective Course Options

CHB 500 Health for Refugee Populations

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

With over 54 million individuals displaced within or outside their countries according to 2013-14 estimates (and the number is rising), refugees represent a major global public health issue. Those who are able to resettle to Western New York represent a significant local public health and individual health care issue. This course provides an introduction to both the global and local health issues related to refugee populations. Health, cultural issues, barriers to care, and services for refugee populations in the United States will be featured, with an emphasis on Western New York’s (WNY) refugee groups. Global historical and policy issues related to refugees and refugee health will also be studied. Through the course, students will use an ecological model to explore (a) policy issues, (b) cultural issues, (c) stress encountered by refugees, (d) major health issues (including mental health) affecting refugee communities, and (d) unmet needs for this underserved population. The class will consider the priorities for refugee health developed by local groups and discuss research needs and practical service or intervention models to address refugee health and ways to evaluate their effectiveness. Local representatives of refugee care and refugee groups will help lead selected classes and participate in discussions. Interprofessional education and care perspectives will be advanced through guest speakers across multiple health domains, service agency presentations, small group work, and experiential learning. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for further work (policy, research or service) in an inter-professionally collaborative manner in the area of refugee health with appropriate cultural competency skills and an understanding of the needs, priorities, and challenges faced by refugees and by organizations and providers who work with refugees.

Instructors: Kozlowski/Collins

CHB 625 Health Disparities

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Health Disparities is a PhD-level elective designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the social determinants of health. The course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to examining differences in health status associated with race, ethnicity, education, income, disability, geographic location, gender, and sexual orientation. We will examine the multiple pathways through which these differences are produced and reinforced, including discrimination, stigma, social network processes, culture, and health care experiences. We will also discuss methods for conducting research and intervening in disadvantaged communities. The course will provide historical and theoretical perspectives on the problem, provide a critical examination of empirical support for various explanatory pathways, and will cover approaches to studying and reducing health disparities. The course will prepare students to conduct independent research on health disparities and health-related research with disadvantaged communities, satisfying many of the Community Health and Health Behavior PhD competencies.

Instructor: Orom

CIE 563 Air Pollution

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

This course surveys the sources, fates, effects and control of air pollution and air pollutants and covers industrial, agricultural and municipal contributions to acid rain, smog, and toxic air pollutants in fish and humans. LEC.

Instructor: Atkinson

EEH 521 Global Health

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Provides an overview of compelling public health problems among the world’s poor. Topics addressed will include infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis; the rise of tobacco-related disease; the role of water, hygiene, and sanitation in the prevention of disease; maternal and neonatal mortality; surveillance; and disaster response in the resource-poor setting. Students will gain practical experience in developing and presenting strategies for the implementation and evaluation of public health programs in the resource-poor setting.

Instructor: Kordas

EEH 573 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: EEH 501

Focuses on the theory and epidemiologic methods used in the epidemiologic study of infectious diseases. Emphasis is on the investigation of infectious disease outbreaks, evaluations of vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, and surveillance for infectious diseases of public health importance. The course includes an examination of the following infectious diseases, among others: HIV/AIDs, influenza, foodborne disease, sexually transmitted infections, dengue fever, and vaccine-preventable diseases.

Instructor: Zorich

EEH 574 Epidemics and Outbreaks

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: EEH 573

Advanced course studying recent outbreaks of infectious disease. Each session will deal with an individual agent, review recent outbreaks, and discuss public health implications. Emphasis will be placed on epidemiologic principles, maneuvers by public health authorities to investigate and contain outbreaks, and relationships to the media. Topics and outbreaks will be selected with immediacy and relevance to public health.

Instructor: Lindstrom

EEH 575 Epidemiologic Applications to Environmental Health

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisites: EEH 501

Provides epidemiology and environmental health students with a working knowledge of epidemiologic theory and practice applied to issues of environmental health. Case studies and specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate the application of epidemiologic theory to understand the role of environmental factors in the etiology of disease.

Instructor: Mu

EEH 596 Special Topics, Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Low-and Middle-Income Settings

3 Credits, Spring Semester

Prerequisite: None

Special topics determined by individual faculty interest.

This course is designed to introduce students to challenges in water, sanitation, and hygiene for low-income countries and their implications for global health and inequities. The course will offer an interactive learning experience for students and provide multidisciplinary perspectives ranging from public health, environmental health, engineering, architecture, policy, and planning. This course welcomes students from all disciplines.

Instructor: Ram

GEO 512 Geography of Health

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

This course provides an introduction to a variety of geographic dimensions of health. Readings are taken from the current literature so that students are up-to-date with respect to the latest findings in this rapidly changing field.

Instructor: Aldstadt

URP 605 Built Environment and Health

3 Credits, Fall Semester

Prerequisite: None

This graduate seminar focuses on the interactions between the built environment and human health including physical health, mental health, and social well-being. First shaped by socioeconomic, cultural, and political forces, the built environment then contributes to shaping the way people carry on activities related to everyday life, work, and play. People’s life styles therefore first contribute to form the built environment and then go on to be influenced by the built environment.

Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the environmental determinants of health, and the utility and limits of planning in promoting health. Topics to be explored include: historical connections between planning and public health, physical activity and the built environment, obesity and the food environment, safety and stress, environmental contribution to mental health, health impact assessment, and planning tools for healthy communities.

Students will discuss assigned readings each week. Discussions will be led and facilitated by peer discussants as well as the instructor. They will produce a 15-page paper and a short presentation on a topic of choice.
Key objectives of this seminar are (1) to understand overall research trends; (2) to find the mechanisms by which the built environment has impacts on health behaviors/outcomes; (3) to become familiar with the literature covering, research methods, and current research gaps; and (4) to become familiar with approaches and methods to modify the built environment to enhance health.

Instructor: Kang

Note

This is a graduate-level seminar type course.