Full citation

Campbell, B. (2010). Applying Knowledge to Generate Action: A Community-Based Knowledge Translation Framework. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 30(1), 65-71.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Research — Non-experimental

Experience level of reader: Fundamental

Annotation: The author combines elements of participatory action research, the Ottawa model of research use and the knowledge-to-action conceptual framework to create a community-based knowledge translation conceptual framework. The objective of the framework is to optimize stakeholder involvement in the creation, translation and application of relevant community knowledge. The framework is explored through a case study about health issues that are specific to children living in a rural community. One way to combine the display of stakeholder commonalities and differences in the new community-created knowledge is to produce a Venn Diagram, a series of intersecting circles that cross maps knowledge content with knowledge source (with one circle for each stakeholder group).

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant: Community, Government, University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Policy Makers, Researchers

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Sector

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary Findings

Model: A community-based knowledge translation conceptual framework — that synergistically combines elements of participatory action research (PAR), the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU) and the knowledge-to-action (KTA) conceptual framework to optimize community stakeholder involvement in the creation, translation and application of new knowledge. Participatory action research and elements of the KTA are used to engage community stakeholders in the creation of knowledge that is relevant and useful to them. Adaptations of the OMRU and the KTA, both originally developed for healthcare settings, are used to guide community stakeholder knowledge implementation and use. The intent of PAR is to co-create knowledge collaboratively and act on that knowledge to address an issue raised by the creators that may result in social change at the local level. The intent of OMRU/KTA is to implement evidenced informed knowledge and then evaluate how that knowledge is adapted and adopted by users. In essence, PAR generates knowledge that the OMRU and KTA translate and disseminate.
Literature review and synthesis.
Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Stage 1, KTA Stage 2, KTA Stage 3

Method: A Venn diagram can be used to depict similar and divergent perceptions voiced by focus group participants. Consisting of two or more overlapping circles, the Venn diagram is a useful tool to examine similarities and differences between concepts in a visual representation that shows the shared characteristics in the overlapping circles.
Literature review and synthesis.
Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 4.11

Tip: Researchers should move out of their familiar context and into the context of the user group to gain insights for effective knowledge translation.
Literature review and synthesis.
Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Stage 1, KTA Stage 2, KTA Stage 3, Step 3.1, Step 2.2, Step 1.1