Full citation

van Kammen, J., Jansen, C.W., Bonsel, G.J., Kremer, J.A.M., Evers, J.L.H., & Wladimiroff, J.W. (2006). Technology Assessment and Knowledge Brokering: The Case of Assisted Reproduction in The Netherlands. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 22(3), 302-306.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Research — Non-experimental

Experience level of reader: Fundamental

Annotation: A knowledge-brokering study was conducted as a deliberate strategy to communicate research findings in a manner that verified and preserved the scientific rigor demanded by researchers, while translating the message into a form meaningful and responsive to the real-time needs of policy makers.

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant: Community, Government, University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Policy Makers, Researchers

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Individual

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary Findings

Method: The study mapped out what the research findings would mean to different groups of actors (stakeholders) involved. In the process they identified six Stakeholder Groups: 1) Clinicians; 2) Consumers; 3) Researchers; 4) Policy Makers; 5) Information Brokers; 6) Manufacturers.
Comparative analysis of policy-related research results and the expectations of policy-makers regarding information useful for application in their decisions.
Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Step 1.B, KTA Step 1.C, KTA Step 2.B, KTA Step 2.C, Gate 7, Step 2.2, Step 1.1

Tip: There is a huge gap to bridge between the kind of questions that policy makers would like to have answered, and the kind of answers that researchers can typically provide. For example, policy makers rarely transmit clear messages on their knowledge needs to inform a feasible and timely solution to a problem within their context. While researchers produce scientific evidence that is not always tailor-made for applications in specific contexts, while also being careful to qualify their findings and set the limitations of their interpretation.
Comparative analysis of policy-related research results and the expectations of policy-makers regarding information useful for application in their decisions.
Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Step 1.A, KTA Step 1.B, Step 1.2, Step 1.1

Secondary Findings

Carrier: According to policy scientists, involving the target users of research information from the start of the process — such as policymakers and healthcare providers — would favor the eventual uptake and use of research results. (C. Weis [1979])
Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Step 1.A, KTA Step 1.B, Step 1.2, Step 1.1