Full citation

Ho, K., Bloch, R.; Gondocz, T., Laprise, R., Perrier, L., Ryan, D., & et al. (2004). Technology-enabled Knowledge Translation: Frameworks to Promote Research and Practice. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 24(2), 90-99.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Research — Non-experimental

Experience level of reader: Fundamental

Annotation: Provides a framework for applying information and communication technologies in support of knowledge translation activities within the health professions. Provides a summary of thirty-four issues grouped in nine categories, all considered relevant to implementation if a technology-enabled knowledge translation (TEKT) system.

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant: Community, Large business, University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Clinicians, Researchers

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Organization

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary Findings

Model: Supply Push versus Demand Pull — Factors influencing the process of KT can be conceptualized in a matrix model. KT is initiated either by knowledge producers or by the system in a push configuration, or by knowledge consumers (practitioners or beneficiaries) in a pull operation. KT efforts must attend not only to what issues are being addressed and how these problems can be solved, but also to why it is important for patients and practitioners that systems changes occur.
Literature review grounded in practical experience of health care professionals.
Occurrence of finding within the model: Stage 1

Methods:

  • Researchers generate new knowledge while working in communities of research, health professionals operate in communities of practice, patients operate their own communities of support. Interacting with all three communities are formally organized governmental organizations, as well as health care industry organizations.
    Literature review grounded in practical experience of health care professionals.
    Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Step 1.B, KTA Step 2.B, Step 2.2, Step 1.1
  • Implementation Issues: These include potential barriers or carriers and can b organized in nine categories: 1) Organizational; 2) Financial; 3) Legal; 4) Ethical; 5) Professional; 6) Users; 7) Logistics; 8) Cognitive; 9) Content.
    Literature review grounded in practical experience of health care professionals.
    Occurrence of finding within the model: KTA Step 1.C, KTA Step 1.D, KTA Step 2.C, KTA Step 2.D, Gate 7, Step 2.3

Secondary Findings

Carrier: Organizations can deal with the tensions inherent in decision-making by focusing on meaning — the GOAL. The purpose or meaning of what the organization intends to accomplish can crate a vision that sets into motion the process through which multiple organizational interests become aligned. (McGee, JV & Prusak, L [1993])
Occurrence of finding within the model: Gate 1, Gate 2, Gate 3, Gate 4, Gate 5, Gate 6, Gate 7, Gate 8, Gate 9