Full citation

Powell, R.A., & Buede, D.M. (2006). Decision-Making for Successful Product Development.Product Management Journal, 37(1), 22-40.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Research — Non-experimental

Experience level of reader: Advanced

Annotation: This paper describes the key decisions related to use of a systems engineering design and management framework. The work integrates concurrent decision making for operational and development systems to obtain and understand stakeholder needs while managing the processes and requirements needed for development. A literature review, case studies and interviews were employed to establish conclusions.

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant: Large business, Small business (less than 500 employees), University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Manufacturers, Researchers

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Organization

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary Findings

Tips:

  • Needs analysis includes problem definition and problem validation. These activities are foundational to the initiation of the systems engineering process and to the successful execution of the design and qualification of both the operational and development systems.
    Case studies and interviews
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 2.2, Step 1.1
  • It is important that information about the stakeholder needs converge with information about technical capabilities.
    Case studies and interviews
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 2.2
  • During the engineering of a system, about 20% of the actual life cycle cost for the system has been spent, but about 80% of the life cycle cost of the system is committed based upon the decisions that have been made during the engineering process. Mistakes due to an improper definition of decisions made in this front end of the system life cycle can have substantially negative impacts on the total cost of the system and its success with the users and bill payers.
    Case studies and interviews
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Stage 1, Stage 2

Secondary Findings

Tip: The inclusion of stakeholders early in the design process focuses on the "user requirements" element of concurrent engineering and mitigates the risk of numerous user-generated design changes later in the development process. (Forsberg, Mooz, & Cotterman [1996])
Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 2.2, Step 1.1