Full citation

Drake, C. (2002). Human Factors: A Vital Component in Product Development and Launch. International Journal of Medical Marketing, 3(1), 7.

Format: Peer-reviewed article

Type: Experience

Experience level of reader: Fundamental

Annotation: Article urge the application of human factors through the product life-cycle to increase product acceptance, prevent costly post-market upgrades and offer a new competitive advantage.

Setting(s) to which the reported activities/findings are relevant: Government, Large business, Small business (less than 500 employees), University

Knowledge user(s) to whom the piece of literature may be relevant: Clinicians, Manufacturers

Knowledge user level addressed by the literature: Organization

This article uses the Commercial Devices and Services version of the NtK Model

Primary Findings

Methods:

  • Human Factors should be treated as part of the critical path in product design, including usability testing, training of users or sales personnel, writing operating manuals, and writing labels and package inserts.
    Medical Device Industry experience.
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 7.10, Step 6.3
  • Research data from educational psychology proves people often have a very difficult time taking general concepts and translating them into specific applications. Ensuring comprehension is an important first step, but is not sufficient. One must help people apply the information, and ensure they can perform the tasks to achieve specific results. This can be done by clearly articulating what a user needs to accomplish and in what context.
    Medical Device Industry experience.
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 4.11, Step 6.3, Step 5.3
  • Human Performance Technology (HPT) extends Human Factors studies by considering four factors influencing performance driven by the desired function: 1) Information — does the person have it and should it reside internally or externally; 2) Environment — how design of systems, devices and work processes help or hinder performance; 3 Selection — does the person have the requisite abilities; 4) Motivation — are there clear goals and feedback mechanisms. These issues are important to the end-user/customers; to the manufacturers and to regulatory bodies such as the FDA.
    Medical Device Industry experience.
    Occurrence of finding within the model: Step 4.5, Step 7.8