our alumni

Kim Krytus, MSW ’07, MPH ’08

Kim Krytus determined her career path at the age of 16 when she read about children dying of starvation in Ethiopia and India. She knew she wanted to be involved in improving the health of vulnerable populations, and that she would need a solid education in public health and in health behavior to do so.

“The MPH program’s focus on health education and behavior gave me a strong academic foundation for the work I do.”
Kim Rook, MSW ’07, MPH ’08
Technical Advisor for Communication, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Global Reach

After earning a Master of Social Work degree from UB, Krytus earned a Master of Public Health degree with a concentration in health behavior in 2008.  She then spent more than a year working in Africa and Asia on projects that aimed to reduce the impact of infectious diseases, such as HIV and influenza, and to improve the health of populations in developing countries.

Krytus next joined the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was contracted by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as a technical advisor. “USAID embedded me in the Bangladesh Ministry of Health and Family Welfare providing day-to-day guidance and capacity-building to the Government of Bangladesh for health communication, knowledge sharing and exchange,” she said.

“The MPH program’s focus on health education and behavior gave me a strong academic foundation for my work, and my master’s project provided me with the experience I needed to work at an international level.”

Krytus has since returned home to Buffalo, and to the School of Public Health and Health Professions. She is the outreach coordinator for the school’s Office of Public Health Practice where she facilitates the development of relationships with local health agencies, the New York State Health Department and other public health institutions. “In my role, I promote health to communities in our region, link information and resources between the school and collaborating public health organizations, and provide students with opportunities for learning and research.”