KTA Tip 7.G

Monitor use by looking at website hits, citations, phone and email inquiries, and survey KU groups.

Navigate Findings

Primary findings

Barriers

One of the factors that can impede knowledge translation is a lack of awareness or access to key knowledge and expertise. Indexes, search engines, expertise locators and social networks can help to remove these barriers.
Literature review and conceptual framework development.
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Tips

One of the factors that is associated with productive knowledge management (knowledge translation) is that knowledge replication is related to knowledge protection. Knowledge replication is the capacity to identify the attributes of the knowledge that are replicable, how these attributes can be recreated, and the characteristics of the contexts in which they can be replicated successfully. Let’s use the example of replicating practice templates or guidelines. Often, in each new organizational context there are differences between the attributes of the knowledge and the context of the action and decisions described in the templates and guidelines. The knowledge that is shared rarely covers every possible local need. The many idiosyncratic features of the local context make precise replication of templates and guidelines difficult. Knowledge replication should be guided by the attributes of the local context.
Literature review and conceptual framework development.
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One of the factors that is associated with productive knowledge management (knowledge translation) is the presence of internal knowledge mapping and external knowledge acquisition capabilities, which complement each other. Internal knowledge mapping enables an organization to become aware of, and understand what it knows. Knowledge mapping helps an organization to identify knowledge gaps, which may be resolved by internal knowledge creation and/or external knowledge retrieval. External knowledge acquisition enables an organization to identify new sources of knowledge. Skills that are critical to effective knowledge mapping and knowledge acquisition include locating, accessing, valuing and filtering pertinent knowledge; extracting, collecting, distilling, refining, interpreting, packaging and transforming the captured knowledge into usable knowledge; and transferring the usable knowledge within the organization for subsequent use in decision-making or problem solving.
Literature review and conceptual framework development.
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Research networks (and projects) should ensure that they are adequately resourced for broad dissemination of research results.
Lessons from a health research network evaluation.
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Secondary findings

Tips

When designing a knowledge translation communication strategy, researchers should consider which communication channels (media) are most applicable and whether the news media should be involved.
Source: Winkler (1985); CRD (1994, 2009); National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (1996, 2001); Harmsworth (2001); Scullion (2002); Lavis (2003); Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (2004); European Commission (2004); Carpenter (2005); Bauman (2006); Friese (2009). In: Wilson, P.M., Petticrew, M., Calnan, M. W. & Nazareth, I. (2010)